How to Determine if a Journal is a Predatory Publisher

How to Determine if a Journal is a Predatory Publisher


So now I would like to cover what predatory
publishers are and how to avoid them. The good thing about the internet and online
publishing is that now things are available online but unfortunately there are people
out there who taking advantage of the situation and trying to create their own journals and
scam authors’ money. What I will be covering in this tutorial is
tips on what to watch out for and resources for determining whether a publisher is legitimate
or predatory. One thing to look out for is if they charge
a publication fee but they say oh let’s accept your article right away or it will be two
weeks before we will get back to you that it’s been accepted. They use similar names to journals that are
available out there so you may think you are submitting to the right journal when it’s
actually a fake one. They also will say yes we will accept your
article within a week or so or something that is really unrealistic so it usually takes
at least 6 weeks or 3 months depending on the journal you are sending it to. They may also send you an unsolicited email
asking you to submit your paper but then if they accept it they may send you an invoice
for getting the journal. We recommend you look at the journal website
and look if they information about their fees that they are charging and I have seen online
journal websites to look and see where they have indexed and if they say it’s in PubMed,
or some other database and then check the database and they say oh yes we are in here
and they’re not. UIC Library has a Selecting Publication Venues
guide. In addition to figuring out where you should
publish it will also help you to figure out if a journal is from a predatory publisher. This guide was created by my colleague Sandy
De Groote our Scholarly Communications Librarian. There are a few links on this guide that you
can take a look at that will help you to determine if an open access journal is from a predatory
publisher. The first one is this Directory of Open Access
Scholarly Publishers Association. They have a list of all of the members that
you can take a look at. Also on their website is Principles of Transparence
and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing and they have some information that may be
helpful to you. It has some principles of Transparency that
might be useful to you for you to take a look at when you are evaluating journals to see
where you should publish in. It gives suggestions in terms of things to
look at for such as the peer review process ownership and management and conflicts of
interest and other kinds of things to think about. Another resource definitely worth know about
is called Think Check and Submit. This has some good tips on what you should
be thinking about when looking for a journal to publish in. They also have a checklist that you can click
on to take a look at and this is just really nice. It looks like it would just fit on a page
for you for some other things to think about when submitting an article. I highly recommend this website. Finally, a library resource that may be helpful
to you is the database called Ulrich’s. Ulrich’s can be found on the Database A to
Z list. Ulrich’s is under Ulrich’s web or Ulrich
Periodicals Directory. It’s the most comprehensive resource on journals
information that is out there. So I am going to search for a journal from
a predatory publisher. This Austen Journal of Nursing and Health
Care. And as I scroll down the list, I don’t see
anything related to that. If you don’t see it in here, it’s probably
not a legitimate journal. To show you an example of something that is
legitimate, American Journal of Nursing. When it’s got that little, it looks like a
jersey, like a referee jersey, it’s telling you if it’s refereed or not. So I clicked on American Journal of Nursing
and then it gives me information about the journal in terms of the publisher information,
history of publication because sometimes the journals change names. Ulrich’s has this abstracting and indexing
section and this will show you all of the databases that a journal is indexed in so
the more databases a journal is indexed in the better chance that researchers will see
your publications and cite them. If you have any questions, you can contact
me or my colleague, Sandy De Groote, Scholarly Communications Librarian. Thank you.

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