How to Reference: Journal Articles and Websites

How to Reference: Journal Articles and Websites


Hi and welcome to Referencing Module Part
3, which covers the common reference types and how to reference them. In this, the second
of our ‘common referencing types videos’, we’ll show you how to reference journal articles,
and also a website. Let’s begin with a journal article. The elements
that comprise a journal article reference in the Harvard UTS style are seen here in
the order in which they’d appear in your reference. They are: the author or authors, the year,
the article title in single quotes, the journal title in italics, the volume and issue number,
and then the page range where the article lives within that specific volume and issue.
Finding this information for journal articles is usually a little bit easier than it is
for a book because all of the information is in the one place. If you’re looking up
a database you should be able to see the entire citation for the article while you are searching,
an example of that is seen here. Also, if you have the full text of the article in paper
of PDF, at the header of the article the same information should be repeated there.
An example of what all of these elements put together in the Harvard (UTS) style is provided
at the bottom of the screen here. So now we are onto the final common referencing
type we are going to take you through – a website. The main elements you need to locate
so that you can reference a website are: the author or authors, the year the page was last
updated, the title of the page, the type of website (if necessary – you can refer to the
Harvard (UTS) referencing guide on our website for this, but an example of a type of website
is a Podcast), the organisation (these are essentially the publishers of a website – if
there is no separate author listed on the page that you’re reading then this organisation
becomes the author and you don’t mention them again a second time in the reference). The
final three elements of the website reference are: the location the website comes from,
and you may not be able to find this out – if you can’t you can leave it blank, but sometimes
this information will be in the ‘About Us’ area of the website, and then finally the
date that you viewed the website and the URL of the page you were looking at in the website
in triangular brackets. Here’s a pretty good example, it’s a government
website. Here we can see the title of the article ‘Media Release 2002…’, we can see
the host or the publisher of the article which is the Australian Electoral Commission. We
can also the URL that the page lives on. We can also see the date that the page was last
updated – the 18th of October 2010. If we scroll down to the bottom of the page, we
can also find the authors of this media release. So if we assembled all of that information
into the order that was presented to us before, we would get a reference that looks something
like this. One thing that’s worth noting is the way you
expressed the access date, you need to write ‘viewed’ and then the number of the day of
the month, the full name of the month that you accessed the website, and the full number
of the year. Just bear in mind that when a website won’t
provide you with all of this information there are tactics you can use according to the Harvard
(UTS) system that will help you deal with them. The author example we mentioned before,
but if there is no date for the page you can also use ‘n.d’ for no date.
Ok so that concludes Referencing Module 3, in Referencing Module 4 we’ll take you through
a bit of a quiz that lets you test out the knowledge of referencing you have acquired
up to this point.

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