Interconnected Medicine – April 2018 Functional Forum

Interconnected Medicine – April 2018 Functional Forum


the world that we see around us is built
on a story there every culture has a different set of answers to these basic
questions of who are you what is it to be a human being what’s important what’s
valuable where do we come from where are we going how does the world work every
culture answers this in a different way and science provides some answers it
says basically that what you are is a discrete separate individual among other
individuals in a universe that’s separate from you as well and every
field has greed with this characterization of what it is to exist
psychology or this bubble of psychology or this mind encased in flesh religion
you are a soul encased in flesh on physics you’re a mass subject to
impersonal forces that are deterministic biology you are basically a flesh robot
programmed by your genes to maximize reproductive self-interest economics you
are a rational actor seeking to maximize financial self-interest all of them
agreed on what it was to exist well the new Sciences contradict that
quantum mechanics seems to violate the separation between self and other if
we’re separate from the universe then of course we want to control these
indifferent or hostile external forces and humanity’s destiny becomes to to
become the lords and masters of nature and to transcend nature and it’s not
working too well anymore in economics that that translates into into growth
that endless growth of the human realm and we’re learning that there’s a limit
to that and we’re learning that this not an external universe out there but that
everything we do to this world we’re doing on some level to ourselves that is
a wound that we feel all the time and that we suffer from that pain of
existing in our culture that’s so I’m to present we don’t even realize it except
when we were bored you know that feeling of why does it hurt just to exist when
we’re young we have this knowledge that the world is supposed to be much more
beautiful than that what has been offered to us as normal we understand
that but that expectation gets betrayed to get in and again and again and to
protect it we develop cynicism as our ecosystems fall apart our political
system our educational system health care system falls apart things aren’t
working so well anymore and it’s a lot harder to fully believe in our stories
so we’re moving into a different story a different story of self a different
story of the world a different story of the people the self of
interconnectedness of self of inner beingness one thing it means is that these tiny
actions may have a significance beyond that we can understand that logic of the
heart that says yeah I know that this is a significant act and I know that
everything I do is significant no longer contradicts the logic of the mind which
had been the logic of separation and what effect could you one tiny little
being have with the puny force available to you when the powers that be have so
much more force at their disposal every act that comes from the understanding of
interconnection of inner being is a spiritual act and also a political act
by acting from a different story we disrupt the psychic substructure of our
mythology and we offer an alternative this is something that’s eminently
practical and anytime that we give somebody an experience that doesn’t fit
into the old story it weakens that old story it disrupts it it could be an act
of generosity it could be act of forgiveness anything
that violates that understanding that we’re separate and and everyone’s in it
for themselves being in service to something larger
than yourself and I would offer that as the formula for stepping into the flow
of synchronicity you don’t know how to get from here to there but that thing
larger than yourself does and it arranges these synchronicities being at
the right place at the right time being in flow I think everyone’s experienced
that and usually when you experience that it’s when your world is kind of
falling apart and you’re in the state of uncertainty and then all things like
start to flow and I start to worry right and we can enter that state when we let
go of the paradigm of control and bow into service to this thing larger than
ourselves and what is this thing what what is it that unifies all of these
different things that were committed to let’s call it the more beautiful world
our heart knows as possible as you go about your life in fact right
now feel that part of you that knows that you are here in service and ask
yourself if you’re ready to bow more deeply into that service if you do it I
predict that you will experience an unexpected opportunity to act on that
intention and it’ll be just at the edge of your courage but not past it you thanks so much everyone for watching
we’ve got an epic lineup tonight off speakers we got an awesome panel here
amazing group of functional doctors technology activists for here for a leap
forward in medicine this is a great gathering you know our goal is to make
it easy for practitioners to learn in community there’s a lot of community
happening tonight I want to say welcome to all the communities that are watching
at home this ecosystem that has been set up by the meetup groups we believe will
be the future ecosystem of this involved primary care network that we are looking
to develop and it all revolves around you there’s an exponential potential to
the future of medicine this is an allopathic conversion machine that we
have just created and can be seen by a billion people at no extra cost that’s
the beauty of the Internet welcome to the functional forum live
from Ashland Oregon please welcome your host hello everyone
welcome thank you so much for such a great warm welcome here in Ashland great
to be here with everyone we’ve got a full house which I hear is unbelievably
hard to do in Ashland because the this building is massive but I’m excited to
be here with you thanks so much so many people to come out we’ve wanted to do a
forum in Ashland for a long time since we started to take the meetups on the
road for so many reasons one because functional medicine and the functional
forum brand has always been about creating community and also there’s just
such a strong thread of that here but also just such a depth of talent and
functional medicine which you’re going to see a little bit of this evening so
the topic this evening is is interconnected medicine and you know you
can see from we’re big Charles Eisenstein fans at the evolution of
medicine and you can see that it’s time for a new story when it comes to
medicine it has to be profoundly interconnected and so what you’re going
to hear tonight are all different ways in which practitioners are seeing both
both the way that the body is interconnected how we’re connected to
each other how the different organs and systems and the body is connected how
community plays a role in medicine so it’s a perfect topic for Ashland
so because this is life it is about 11 months since we did a live functional
forum it’s my favorite one to do always when the tech works it’s better but you
know we haven’t done it for a while and I love doing it like this and what it
means if you’re at home watching or listening you can use Twitter if we have
it up on the on the screen there if you hashtag functional forum if you’re
watching at home anywhere around the world you can ask questions and I can
answer those questions as we go through so I just want to give a shout out to
all the meetup groups that are watching one of the coolest things that has
happened as a result this is the fifty first episode of the functional forum if
you can believe it but we have thank you we have more than
500 meetup groups around the world of doctors getting together sometimes it’s
just two people learning at home sometimes it’s a hundred and fifty
people in a dining room in Glendale California and getting together to learn
about the future of Medicine to learn about functional medicine to learn about
how we can adapt how medicine can adapt to its new environment of chronic
disease so for all the meetup groups are watching thank you so much for being
part of our community and all of the meetup groups are sponsored by dry farm
wines hopefully you got some wine there in the back they’ve been huge sponsors
of us at the evolution of medicine a bit later this year we’re going on a 40 City
tour and try farm wines gonna have a little van that’s gonna drive behind us
and serve their biodynamic organic low calorie wines to people all over the
country and if you if you build a meetup group so Ashland I don’t know I’m sure
if there’s a meetup group on Ashland there definitely should be after this
but if you get 20 people to that meetup group and it’s not gonna be hard to pick
cause you’ve got 150 right here you get a free case of wine so that is I know
you’ve got good wine up here you don’t need to be told what to do with your
wine but a free case is pretty good and that’s to to jail the community so we’re
going to talk about interconnected medicine let’s make sure the slides are
up on the side here so everyone can see see this so you know if I told you
recently that as soon as I set up the energy that this was going to be the
month of interconnected medicine some really weird things started to happen in
medicine and a weird kind of interconnection started to happen can we
put this up on the slide so Cigna bought express grip
for fifty billion dollars CVS bought Aetna for 69 billion dollars and Walmart
is now in an early stage acquisition with Humana not exactly the
interconnection I was hoping for honestly and I don’t think the kind of
the kind of interaction that we were all hoping for if you like if you like it
you know food from Walmart you know cigarettes from CVS not technically
health care and we may be going a little bit further down a route that we
probably don’t want to go down but I think this speaks to you know sort of
the opportunity and what you’re going to hear tonight is that you know what I’ve
always said the first thing that I ever said on the functional forum and this
was four years ago is like you know we we’ve got to start
as a community and when I say the community I mean all the practitioners
in the community who are practicing integrative functional naturopathic
medicine and the patients who use that medicine you know one of the things that
we’ve always asked to go to start acting like we’re winning stop acting like
we’re losing because this is the future of chronic disease management in just a
couple of months we’re going to see that starting to come out from the Cleveland
Clinic and show better outcomes at lower cost for chronic disease this is the
future of care but just because of this sort of history of the man sort of
stamping on the industry that’s sort of like this inferiority complex and one of
the things that we’ve been trying to do is to build confidence in the community
because ultimately you know ultimately medicine is is and the cost of medicine
is heading in a really bad direction unless we do something different and I
think that a lot of the answers to the most vexing problems in medicine are
going to be communicated here today and we’re seeing as far as that many
Americans are actually just skipping insurance altogether it says here prices
and deductibles are rising networks are shrinking and even some well-off
Americans are questioning what they’re paying for
so tonight we’re going to talk a little bit we’re gonna have eight amazing
speakers who are going to be coming through and sharing their viewpoints on
interconnected medicine and then right at the end I’m gonna make a massive
announcement that I planned for over a year and I wanted to make it in Ashland
because this is the this is the capital city of community it feels like am i
right right this is America’s capital of community
so you know so we be taking a stab so you know ultimately you know that what
we started off as was a show right the functional forum was just a show and we
our goal was to make it easier for people to be a functional medicine
doctor we need way more of them right in Ashland you may think you have an
embarrassment of riches and there’s one on every corner but it’s not like that
in the rest of the country and so you know so the first step was to just
coordinate the community make it easy for doctors to switch and learn about
holistic medicine and I feel that functional medicine is the name and the
brand that will bring this to the masses and so I’m really you know excited to
help to forge the movement forward but last year I started to realize that
building a network of independent practices while necessary to the future
of the movement was not sufficient to get us to a point where everyone could
get functional medicine and one of the biggest sort of elephants in the room
was 150 million Americans get their health care from their employer right
and so unless you have something like at the chance of an employer and a
functional medicine practice sort of locking arms and making it work is zero
almost zero and so you know we started a new venture called new health and one of
the cool things that we announced last month was this product called incentive
care from been a comp and ultimately what been accompanied lized and they’re
ahead of the game on this is that ultimately you know that if you eat the
best way to change the cost of care for your company is to get people well and
to incentivize them to be well and to get them off drugs and to incentivize
them to help each other and we’re going to be talking a lot more about that so
if you’re watching this at home and you know of an employer that needs to cut
the cost of care which is basically every employer and if you add to that
that the employer has the best incentive to cut costs right because every dollar
that they save ends up more profit on the bottom line this is a big
opportunity for functional medicine so if you are watching this and you know of
a company or if you’re a CEO or an HR manager if you go to go Evo medCom slash
employer give us your details and we’ll be in touch and show you some options
you know the other thing is that we’re going to need an army of providers so if
we sign an I don’t know if you sign an employer in
Ashland the biggest employer in Ashland OR Medford and we signed them up and now
they’re using this program we need doctors to be able to fulfill that so if
you’re a physician around the country and you’re interested in getting
functional medicine consults and working with employers we’d love to hear from
you and you can go to new health.com slash kpo to apply nurses nurse
practitioners and doctors and then later this year part of what we’re doing here
today is sort of like a preview for what this tour is gonna look like I just
decided that you know going to these functional forums every every the first
Monday of every month is fun but I love living in Venice Beach I don’t really
like traveling so much and everyone was just like hey Austin and Charlotte and
you know can you come and do one in our community and we only do 12 a year so I
was like I’m gonna get my family we’re gonna get on a bus and we’re gonna go
and do 40 back-to-back so that’s coming June so you’ve all got a flyer for it so
you know if you’re watching this we’d love to see you and we’ll be talking
more about that as we go on all right so at the time for our first speaker as I
said we have an embarassment of functional medicine Rich’s here in
Ashland and you know one of the powerhouses of the functional medicine
movement I know they’ve helped a lot of people in this town please a warm
welcome to the stage dr. Michael stone hello hello hello well first of all
thank you very much for this opportunity and I wanted to say that seeing all of
you we’re pretty connected we’ve known we came here we came here
years ago David Jones the first president of Institute for functional
medicine asked Leslie and I to come to join his practice so he could do that
and almost all the practitioners that I’ve seen here tonight we’ve shared
patients and we’re connected at least there I’m connected to Leslie stone
who’s supposed to give this first talk but because of death of a sister last
week I said I would step in we have to rethink medicine we have to rethink it
because the chronic disease epidemic and what I want to do tonight in the next
six minutes is talk about how we’ve rethought when disease begins we disease
begins it actually begins pre conceptually it actually begins the last
generation it actually begins the generation before that we know that
there are methylation markers that our DNA is marked by the environment of our
ancestors and what happens in the womb is key for what happens in instance of
chronic disease when you look at the functional medicine timeline notice on
the left the vertical line on the left we have the preconception and the
prenatal period it really begins with the genetics of the mother and what’s
washing over those genetics and the genetics of the father as you see and
the genetics of the father actually affect how the nutrients are transported
across the placenta so what is bathing the the
fetus it is affected by many different aspects in our and during the nine
months all the different things were exposed to whether it’s adequate over
and under nutrition or whether it’s toxins or infections or mitochondrial
dysfunction whether it’s our billet the mother’s
ability to detox how she transports molecules from point A to point B to how
the hormone HPA TG axis affects the stress levels in the fetus affects
disease there are four phenotypes the child is too stressed too early too
small or too large and all those other aspects listed in that and that column
effect that outcome and any of those four phenotypes affects the disease
occurrence in that offspring and in that offsprings offspring and that offsprings
offsprings offspring that we know from primate rodent and now early human
studies we know all the chronic illnesses but especially these four are
transmitted transgenerational E by affecting different genetic markers and
how do we change that and so the program that we’re talking about is really
assessing some of the genetics of the mother trying to address very
specifically by trimester and actually during pre conceptually different key
nutrients trying to assess the five modifiable lifestyle lifestyle
components of nutrition sleep exercise thoughts and emotions and relationships
and we then affect the outcome of that pregnancy so has it really worked well
when you start thinking transgenerational e and when you start
looking through this lens and looking through the functional medicine lens as
Lesley and our clinic has Leslie has delivered over five thousand babies in
her career I delivered about 1500 before I stopped we delivered a small village
and what we saw in family practices patterns
and so we started to go through we started to go through and try to
consider what things can we change and how can we impact transgenerational
health and so he put together a program with a brilliant nutritionist Emily red
bomb who’s going to be speaking right after myself and using her nutrition
knowledge and health coaching and our functional medicine knowledge and the
shoulders of the Giants we stood on in our functional medicine understanding
and we put together a program that when we compared of the first 110 people who
went through that program to to the people in our community we noticed that
the pre that we noticed that preterm birth rates were non-existent in those
110 and then we started looking at what was the effect on pregnancy induced
hypertension gestational diabetes small-for-gestational-age large for
gestational age and compared to the state and national and world data and
look at our numbers and we know that if people are those babies are not too
small to stress too large or too early we know that their chance of chronic
disease by the time they’re 18 is significantly less but if it’s
transgenerational it should affect the outcome of health in the next generation
so we started looking at the offspring and where autism is one in 45 males and
one in 160 females we had one child out of 400 on the spectrum and atopic
dermatitis and asthma is that much less so the interconnectedness of us as
fathers as mothers to our child in the womb to their health and disease is
prominent and emerging and so our timeline begins for them preconception
thank you thank you Michael for sharing that and
you guys will you see what are the themes here is the use of functional
medicine and coaching and attrition together that is a huge part of the kind
of practice model that we’ve been advocating for to have practitioners
working together so let’s hear from the other part of that dynamic duo we’re
following the trend here sort of generationally so we’re starting right
at the beginning with preconception thank you Michael for stepping in for
Leslie so let’s welcome up to the stage here’s Emily ramp thank you my name is Emily red BOM and I
have had the immense pleasure for my entire life to listen to functional
medicine dr. Michael and dr. Leslie stone are my parents I literally was
birthed into this world yet when I was tasked with the translation of what this
profound research suggests I had mothers and fathers looking at me with these
eyes world with tears saying what in the world am I supposed to do with this
information not only can I create this child I can birth this child and then
now you’re telling me I could affect my family for three generations what do I
do so taking the the current research that
dr. Leslie and dr. Michael stone put together I helped them create an
implementation program that implementation program was based off of
the modifiable lifestyle factors which does include sleep movement relaxation
relationships but primarily food because if there’s one thing we know whole food
is always going to open the parachute we know that if we’re going on a boat trip
we want food and water and our boat but if we hit the doldrums man do we want a
different current so in the true essence of functional medicine
which I think the magic lies in the individualization of what that person is
and who the person is sitting in front of me I was able to create are my slides
working I was able to create twelve different food plans that addressed
timing first and foremost that in the first trimester we know that
organogenesis is the primary function of what a female is doing in the
development of a fetus and in organogenesis we know that there are
very specific nutrient cofactors that when we meet that woman with the right
timing that we can ensure that we are addressing her nutrient needs through
protein fats and carbohydrates and also the very specific micronutrient needs of
minerals and vitamins so these food plans are based off of 1st through 4th
trimester information we also know that following these common morbidities and
pregnancy in the United States and in the world that there are very specific
mortalities and morbidities that come with pregnancy induced hypertension
gestational diabetes small and large for gestational age babies as well as the
nutrient needs that may come from a woman who is breastfeeding or a woman
who experiences anxiety and depression in pregnancy and therefore potentially
in the postpartum time period as well and so delivering this every single day
so I have been a part of the 400 women that have gone through our grow baby
program as Michael elucidated these women were not only met with an
individualized nutrition plan we also recognized that stress plays a large
role and impacts what we choose to eat and when we are able to address sleep
recovery and there are foreign hormone balance and therefore mindfulness and
our food choices and reinforce that and I think one of
the most ancient and wisest traditions in healing which is group gathering like
we are doing now that profound change can happen and in also the spirit of
this interconnectedness we know that people learn in very different ways so
our grow baby program not only highlights the individual we gather
women who are of like gestational age encourage their partners or any of the
family or community support that they may have to come and join so that they
can reinforce the same message to this female where then all of a sudden
there’s a culture of empowerment because what we know about the social narrative
of an American mother an American father is that it is the undertow is very
fear-based we want to erase all of that and our
program reinforces it time and time again of look at everything you can do
to affect this change look at everything you can do to change three and four
generations of your family’s health and in that moment you watch face changes
you watch body changes and you realize that they have received and heard this
information that they can do this so one of the things that we realize Leslie and
I realized was oh man we we would love to travel all over this world and help
bring this information this rich information to all the women and all the
parents who may desire it yet we can’t be in a million places at once so we
created technology platforms that disseminated this information in a
readily available way online there are blessings and curses of Technology and
I’m going to consider this one a blessing where we were able to transmit
and translate our information into e-learning modules and even into a
mobile app so you literally have a nutritionist in your pocket and it’s all
based off of foods we know that are going to change metabolic process
it is all based off of stress management techniques that we know are specific to
a second trimester change in maternal health and there and therefore fetal
health outcomes and it also encourages the other pillars of what we know
lifestyle is which is movement relaxation and also relationships and so
between our in-person classes the constant reinforcement care that’s given
in clinic and then reinforced in different technology platforms we have
been able to create a robust program that reinforces and empowers mothers
everywhere and it is as jr. Tolkien says in life I will not be walking backward
and so I think moving forward with this information it is with urgency that we
try to reach as many women as we possibly can thank you so much thanks
Emily so many people give Jacob urgency is absolutely crucial I’m so glad that
we you know brought that you know obviously the value of functional
medicine to unwind chronic disease is super-powerful but ultimately we need it
in more scalable formats to be able to get to the masses so technology plays a
huge role groups player huge role you know any any healthy behavior when
reinforced by a group ends up being that much easier to stick to and actually
that more functional and I just want to share one one example of an idea that
I’ve seen happening everywhere else it’s probably happening in Ashland just
because of the psyche of the Ashland ER but one thing is that what we know what
we heard is that people say oh it’s very difficult to cook all the healthy meals
at home and we’ve heard of groups of people doing what we’re calling
community batch cooking so imagine when you batch cook on a Saturday or a Sunday
for all your meals for the week doing that in a group with a glass of dry farm
wines very fun maybe even using a some people do it on a Monday and take over a
restaurant and a commercial kitchen because the restaurants shut on Monday
so you know that’s a great way to be able to to you know if you’ve got to
make spaghetti bolognaise it’s gonna take as long to make it for two people
as it is for 20 and so you know there’s there’s value in there so thank you
Emily for sharing I know there’s some transgenerational epigenetic warriors in
the room Jennifer Margulis is here and others so it’s really really proud so if
we were going to have a show on interconnected medicine I couldn’t
really do the show and not have someone representing Chinese medicine because
although it’s not directly correlated with functional medicine I know that
there are many many practitioners that find the synergies between it and it is
a profoundly interconnected type of medicine so please welcome Ashlyn
fan-favorite his office is literally a stone’s throw away please welcome Jason
Miller thank you so much James thank you all so glad to be here tonight
I thought first I just mentioned that I think Michael said it standing on the
shoulders of giants and that’s what I feel like when I’m standing in this room
with all of you all my friends and peers and colleagues and I look up to and have
learned so much from thank you all so much for being a part of this amazing
community the stone family these are David Jones people that have been an
inspiration to me you know and coming from a traditional medical system
Chinese medicine I didn’t get a lot of functional medicine in my training it’s
not really a part of what we do but I did dig deeply into biomedical concepts
and I was a pre-med major and my early college years and I find that the two
systems traditional Chinese medicine and biomedicine of today they’re very
connected they’re wonderfully woven and they just have to be approached in a way
that they maintain their own sovereignty and I think that’s really important and
I want to talk about when I think about interconnectedness between our community
and how we connect our different forms of medicine you know we got into this
idea that integrative we want to integrate everything bring it all
together which kind of has this synthesizing type of an
idea but I think what happens when we do that is we start to lose some of the
power of the strength of those sovereign systems and when we bring them together
for me it’s important that I maintain the integrity of the system that I was
trained to use this traditional medical system called traditional Chinese
medicine and when I think about bringing it into the modern context you know and
I think about the term interconnected I think about people and I think about
their relationships I think about my community I think about nature and I
think about our weave with it and sitting here and watching the
eight-minute video that started off this functional forum I really got a really
deep sense and a really nice emotional sense about what this movement really is
because getting here today I didn’t really know this is my first time into
the functional forum and it was all kind of mysterious as it kind of built
towards this day and I feel like watching that video brought me a lot
closer to what this is all about and what it means to to bring functional
medicine closer to the people who need it
you know our population of people here in the United States and around the
world who need a deeper care they need a more thoughtful approach they need a
deeper look at their problems they need lifestyle change they need to change
their diet they need to change their lifestyle they need to see why it’s
important to do those things so we need to coach them we need to work with them
and teach them and so that’s where I think that we can come together all of
us sharing our talents and our gifts and bringing together this collaborative
medical system that I envision for the future and hopefully we can get there
all together and with the help of James in this group and the groups around the
country I think we have a great shot at it so I want to mention you know when we
think about traditional Chinese medicine people often think of you know this sort
of ancient form of medicine that’s often thought of as woowoo it’s often thought
of as fairy dust words like key words like yin and yang
what does all this mean well for me when I chose my direction and I moved away
from just straight biomedical approach to medicine when I when I left medical
school in my fourth year I finally said you know I’m gonna do something
different and I found that the actually the
concept of yin and yang is what inspired me the most it was that this basic the
structure of our world is duality everything is somehow in relationship to
something else there’s no thing that isn’t relative to something else for it
to exist I’m above you guys right now but I wouldn’t be above you if you
weren’t below me and so there’s this relationship and everything and so
Chinese medicine applied that basic principle to everything and it started
with a lot of kind of Taoist principles also that that were very dear to my
heart that nature is is a deep well of knowledge and wisdom for us were deeply
connected to it without it we don’t survive we need each other and that’s
what brought me to Chinese medicine and why I focused in on that area of course
I’ve branched out a lot from there and one of the places I’ve gotten deep into
is research and so when you get into research in the modern day you know
taking a traditional Chinese medical system that has its roots over 2,000
years ago bringing it to today well it’s a living organism so it lives in today
traditional Chinese medicine is alive today and there’s research continually
going on in China and around the world on studying how these medical concepts
and how these therapies that were developed so long ago can help people
today and so we have to take the research that we have and find out
what’s the best available evidence we have and I put up here at you know
traditional usage traditional usage well that’s the first place I go to I go to a
textbook I go to somebody it’s something that I learned from a teacher I want to
find out if it’s a plant medicine even if it’s a drug that came from a plant I
want to know what was it’s used traditionally when people saw the world
a little differently when people were present a little differently and they
understood how something worked through empirical observation over generations
they gained information knowledge and that to me is important and that’s the
first place I look for evidence and then I go to the research I dig through
PubMed I go through the Cochrane Database I find what is there to point
to the truth in this situation what’s the best available evidence to show me
is this gonna work for my patient or not and then I’m gonna go to what is my
clinical experience what have I found to work
or not or what did my teacher or my colleague teach me and I put those
things together because right now the cost of research is so exorbitant I mean
I deal with plants I use herbal medicine these plant medicine all the time every
day but to study plants in a phase 3 clinical trial its exorbitant I mean
it’s 125 million dollars is the prediction to get a drug passed through
phase 3 trials who is gonna pay for that for a plant that you can’t patent you
can’t make any money off of it nobody’s gonna do that so slowly research is
trickling in in China in Mehta and universities and institutions that are
education based so the best available evidence might not be what we find on
PubMed it might be some combination of these things that I put up here so
traditional medicine I like this slide because there’s a path in the forest
where people have already walked for how to do things how to make dietary changes
for people how to apply foods as medicine how to apply medicines into
people how do I you know understand what’s going on for them and address
their problems the path has already been there because we’ve walked on it so we
don’t want to start from we don’t know anything we’re gonna start from today
and whatever we know within the research context we know and anything else is
non-existent it doesn’t exist it’s not evidence that’s not where I start I
start with the traditional evidence because we’ve already walked these
droves the people that were doctors a thousand years ago in a village they
cared about their patients just like we did they shared information just like we
did they they were they were digging for the truth all the time so this brings me
to collaborative medicine which i think is the most important term it’s this
multidisciplinary multi-perspective ‘el approach where we actually collaborate
and we say your lens that you see the world through that’s beautiful the way
that you can address this patient you take their pulse you look at their
tongue you ask them a huge host of questions and then we evaluate their lab
work together and the doctor says you know I also did a couple of extra
studies we did an EEG we did an EKG they were a holter monitor for two weeks and
then we put the information together and we say god you know this patient could
benefit so much from what both sides of the
the the doctrines are bringing here how we can make this patient the centerpiece
for something really beautiful a piece of art that we bring together and so
collaboration to me means that we we all do our parts we play our parts we play
our roles in a non hierarchical setting where we all respect each other and we
respect each other’s ideas and we even get into disputes and arguments because
that’s important to be able to you know enrich what we know and how we know what
we don’t know and so I love that challenge with each other so
collaborative medicine is my push and I think that traditional Chinese medicine
has a beautiful place in it and what what was just said earlier today about
how we can affect change across generations I think that that’s been
known for a long time and to see the evidence coming out now is really
beautiful the microbiota has become a huge focus now in in medicine neuro
gastroenterology a huge place that we’re realizing that the microbes that inhabit
our bodies actually have a huge role in how we think how we feel our health well
you know what that has to do with our ecosystem has to do with the soil of our
bodies and we’ve known that forever people have known that we didn’t know
there are microbes we didn’t need to we knew that if we fed our body a different
kind of soil that it changed the ecosystem in our bodies and then it
changed how we feel now we know that there are microbes that actually feed on
the different things we eat they actually change the way that we
metabolize those foods that we eat they change the neurotransmitters in our
brains they change how we think and how we feel so what we’re learning today
oftentimes points back to some of the truths that we have from back in the
early days of Medicine and so I’m all about bringing it together so my my
ideas whole medicine where we address the whole person we look at their you
know somebody touches them we feel their bodies we touch their skin we take their
blood pressure we take their pulse we examine all aspects what we call
Sherlock’s corner all available evidence I want to know everything I can about
that patient I’m not gonna deny them getting some kind of testing I’m
probably gonna refer them to testing people come to me a lot for four
care in their cancer the managing their cancer and a lot of people come to me
and say hey you know I want to I want you to treat your my cancer I want you
to give me ABS to treat my cancer I look at them and I say wow you know you have
an advanced disease here you know we need to do I’m happy to support you with
herbs but let’s get over to see my friend who’s a general surgeon and my
other friend who’s an oncologist and let’s see if we can get a little more
information and maybe put together a plan where we can help you diminish this
tumor and we can use herbs and nutrition to support you and get you on the right
diet and slowly over time we’ll really be able to keep you strong through these
therapies but again it’s collaboration that’s gonna give us the best outcomes
thank you all so much for the time great to be here thank you Jason much
appreciated give us a bad yeah so we had to have you
know Chinese medicine as a piece there and collaboration is so key and that’s
one of the reasons why would the functional form it was so important for
us to build these meetups because you know what we saw was so many
practitioners he practiced a different type of medicine felt super isolated in
their community they didn’t know anyone else who did it they would go to other
conferences and maybe see other people around there maybe once or twice a year
but ultimately getting together regularly and one of the reasons why I
wanted to bring this up is because what we’ve seen is that those practitioners
that get into a regular community connection where they’re meeting once a
month with other like-minded practitioners their confidence goes up
and ultimately we need a strong dose of confidence in many areas and my next
guest I think speaks to a little bit of this because type-2 diabetes is a
perfect example for me of the differentiator between what the medicine
that we have now and what it could be in the future you know the medicine that
you get for type 2 diabetes metformin it is not possible for that to reverse the
condition there is no way back with that plan to get to a point where you’re just
healthy and this is not just in America as the most prevalent but you know my
dad lives in South Africa growing up 15 or 20 years ago the number one diagnosis
is TB now the number one diagnosis type 2 diabetes so this is super-important
everywhere on the other side you know you see the reversal of type C
diabetes fairly frequently in the clinics of the practitioners that we’re
working with and so the confidence to be able to say hey look we’re reversing
type 2 diabetes in our practice comes from having a structure to do it
consistently and I’m always excited when practitioners feel the sense of
confidence like I’ve done this ten times I’m going to talk about it because I
know that you can do it too and there is a man in the ashen area who does that
would be friends for a few years I know that his patients are getting better and
I know he’s having the tough conversations in medicine that are
really hard to have when you’re talking about lifestyle change
please welcome dr. Thadeus Carla so whether you’re a healthcare provider or
not how many of you feel that you have information or advise you if you could
give it to somebody it would improve their life raise their hand okay now
raise your hand if you’ve been in front of someone and you laid out all this
great information but they didn’t make the changes so there’s already enough
hurdles out there to get your message across to people and I think one of the
most impactful statements that came to me during one of my talks was
information does not equal implementation and we can have the best
information in the world and these speakers tonight are great and I have no
doubt that of everyone in this room that you have an amazing skill set an amazing
amount of information but if it’s not being implemented then what’s the point
so and I think there’s an elephant in the room and there’s a bubble that that
I believe I believe is is coming in healthcare and I believe that the people
in this room are committed to whoops did that other one show up on there oh yeah
then I believe there’s a bubble there’s an elf in the room and there’s a bubble
coming if we don’t correct this and the worst question a patient can ask is that
I’m going to share with you tonight that whenever I hear this question come out
of a patient’s mouth my heart sinks because whenever I hear this question I
realize that we are so off track from what we should be focused on now why I
will agree that is a very legitimate question and it is a relevant one but
it’s completely misguided and I believe it’s almost creating this mindset that’s
almost akin to arguing over how we should arrange the the deck furniture on
the Titanic and it’s completely misguided and why is this important well
I would say it’s the worst question the patient can ask and I’d say this is this
is the tipping point that perpetuates rising costs worsening outcomes and your
sanity as a provider and it inhibits your ability to do your job and we know
even though even though life expectancy was growing for many many years and
where it should be versus around 2011 it started the
plateau and for the last two years in a row it’s actually dropped for the first
time in history so that we know we see a big gap in terms of where we should be
despite spending more and more money so why is this a problem well in about 1960
we spent about 1200 dollars a year on health if you can call it health now
we’re spending about 10,000 which and that’s adjusted for inflation which is
about an eight times increase which from the 1960 we went for about 5% to around
18% of our GDP are we getting healthier or sicker as a nation we’re getting
sicker and we’re spending more money doing it so we know what we’re doing
isn’t working even looking at the simple obesity rates we know has been going up
dramatically we have some states now that are approaching 40% obesity I have
never never in my career ever one time met someone that loved being obese and
what I mean by that is nobody wants to be this way and despite spending more
and more money and throwing more money this we’re not getting to the root
problem inter functional medicine of course I had to throw organ up there to
represent right 28 percent obesity rates and you can see where we started back
when they first started tracking this data out there you go on the slide there
so you can see where we started back in well about in the 90s when we started
keeping track of this data so we know that we’re getting sicker and this can
be just about for any trend right this is diabetes you can look at just about
any healthcare issue and we’re getting sicker as a nation we’re living shorter
and we’re spending more money those curves and those those graphs can’t keep
going in that direction much longer and again information doesn’t equal
implementation we don’t need another diet book if if diet books were all we
needed this country the u.s. would be probably one of the thinnest countries
in the world we don’t need another diet book we don’t need another special
potion or lotion or pill now all those things do have their place but we need
to be getting to the root cause of the conversation we talk about getting to
the root cause of medicine but are we getting to the root cause of the
conversation and there’s a wedge and there’s an elephant in the room that
we’re not adequately addressing and it shapes the decision of where the patient
is going to go whether they’re going to be a success and a win or are they going
to be a loss and I believe one of the worst questions out there that makes my
heart sink is do you take my insurance and while I believe that’s a very
relevant one I believe it completely drives a wedge between what the the
provider wants and thinks is best for the patient and what the insurance is
willing to pay so now you have this patient-doctor relationship and the
insurance company is a major wedge and I don’t know how many of you well I won’t
make you raise your hands on this but I know many providers hesitate to have the
conversation about what they really believe in their heart is best for a
patient out of fear that the patient won’t be willing to pay for it or
can’t pay for it so they never even have the conversation or providers that
dismiss the best treatment or the best recommendation out of fear that they
have to have the conversation of yeah well I know your insurance won’t pay for
this anyways or it’s experimental so yeah I don’t know what that is or when a
patient calls a clinic and says do you take my insurance and they say no and
that’s the end of the conversation even though that may be the practice or the
provider that that patient needs and again I’m not saying that it’s not a
relevant question and I’m not even saying that it’s the patient’s fault
it’s the mindset that we have today that we that is permit is really permeated on
mindset that or there are culture as a whole that we believe that insurance is
there to take care of everything I was speaking in LA and at a conference and
right before I went on stage this gentleman got up there and he was an
insurance adjuster and he said here’s the problem and it was really
enlightening for me because I kind of have this have this idea that insurance
agents and the drug companies are kind of the villains right and he gets up
there and he said here’s the problem patients and the public wants insurance
to cover more and more however insurance was never designed the way it is today
insurance was designed to account for the unexpected let that sink in for a
second insurance was never designed for preventative insurance was designed for
the unexpected let’s use a real simple example if someone is morbidly obese
they eat horribly they don’t exercise and all they eat is sugar all day long
and they happen to get diabetes is that unexpected well of course not and this
is the problem is it’s kind of akin to going to the car dealership and thinking
that the insurance should pay for your oil change or that the insurance should
pay for new windshield wipers or your insurance should pay for new tires on
your car imagine the cost of insurance for your car insurance if we expected
everything everything that we had for our cars to be going through our car
insurance and then where would the personal responsibility be to maybe
drive a little bit slow around curves to save on the tires – maybe maybe take a
little bit better care of maybe our engine or to change the oil
sooner if we knew that it was our responsibility versus someone else was
going to be paying for it and I would illustrate that this is part of the
problem in that health care costs are going up we’re getting sicker as a
nation and doctors more and more are not having the conversation about what
patients really need and instead are telling patients what they think they’ll
go for so I would challenge if you’re in health care
I would I would have you do a gut check whatever your next time you’re talking
to a patient are you telling them really what they need and what’s best for them
or are you telling them what they think that their insurance will cover and for
your patients or your family and friends say I would encourage you to say that
same thing in terms of really the question should be what is the decision
what is the best decision for me with the least amount of side effects and
risks and who is the best to help me with that and then decide is my
insurance gonna cover this or not or if it def my insurance isn’t going to cover
this then ask yourself where are my priorities in this and I’m so my
encouragement to you is to have that tough conversation and not be afraid to
open that up with your patients thank you thanks Thaddeus such an important
part you can give it to micro all right so we’re going to move swiftly along and
that was you know we’re gonna come back to insurance later so watch this space
got something exciting to talk about right at the end so earlier on I spoke
about type 2 diabetes a minute ago the second biggest killer the biggest issue
that’s happening is cardio metabolic disease we have you know a leading light
in that back to do his presentation he is dr. Michael stone healthy healthy you determining the
health of you well it comes down to modifiable lifestyle changes that all of
us have control of but often with cardio metabolic syndrome you know you know the
symptoms elevated blood sugar elevated blood lipids elevated blood pressure
increased body composition I’m meaning more fat being overweight obese but now
we’re looking and we know that every single one the modifiable lifestyle
factors can influence that we know all of us know our blood Sugar’s and our
cholesterol levels or lipid levels but we’re looking at them differently we
know that inflammation can be the result or the driver of all the problems in
carton metabolic syndrome and then when you look through the functional medicine
lens look through the functional medicine matrix
whether it’s nutrient adequacy for your genotype whether it is underlying
infection chronic infection mitochondrial dysfunction your ability
to detoxify everything from heavy metals to pollutants to your ability to
transport sugar or lipids in and out of different spaces to the neuro endocrine
influences and structurally how you are unique as your fingerprint then you can
begin to figure out how to reverse your condition inflammation is the driver and
all the causes all the systemic causes that that Jason Miller talked about we
know where many of these initiators happen prenatally we know that if
inflammation continues unabated that indeed it will lead to Alzheimer’s some
of the inflammatory causes of dementia which a dr. Gordon is going to speak
about a lot of healing has to occur when we really take into account what’s
driving our inflammation 50% of people with normal lipids have heart attacks
50% of people who their first symptom of heart disease is sudden cardiac
so we need to look at things other than just the standard lipid panel when you
reach up each of you reach up and feel your carotid artery right your carotid
pulls up here at the carotid bulb the question you have is do I have that
vessel inflammation do I have disease do I have inflammation
I have to take care of well we take advantage of carotid into a medial
thickness the advanced lipids and we try to figure out with additional testing
for endothelial dysfunction whether our vessels are moving from healthy to
endothelial dysfunction or you start getting injury to plaque accumulation
and this is all subclinical long below before somebody has a heart attack or
stroke or at EIA and our goal is to reverse that and we reverse that with
the help first the technology that helps us in office ultrasound that helps us
determine whether somebody has disease whether they have disease and haven’t
had an event where they’ve had an event and we do not want that them to have
another one and so we take advantage of health coaches and nutritionists that
really help help the patient help their change and it really is that partnership
between the client the patient their willingness to change meeting with the
nutritionists and health coach in group group medical visits or group education
visits monitoring three months six months to a year and in the last eight
years we’ve successfully had reversal of inflammation reversal of heart plaque to
mix plaque to soft plaque by controlling inflammation when you understand your
inflammatory drivers which each of us have unique inflammatory drivers we can
then begin to understand what our risk is a cardio metabolic syndrome and how
we can reverse it I got into this because my grandfather and father each
had heart attacks and strokes by the time
there were 50 I had normal lipids until I was 54 I thought everything was great
I had carotid intima-media thickness testing and I had the arteries of an 84
year old at 51 using the old markers really didn’t help and thus started the
journey of figuring out the drivers of inflammation they can be autoimmune
disease can be heavy metals can be died can be lack of sleep issues with
exercise all of the modifiable lifestyle changes that actually when instituted
will bring hope because I don’t look at anybody with a thorough Scott disease or
cardio metabolic syndrome and believe that they cannot improve their condition
when you look at through the functional medicine the collaborative lens the
interconnected understanding of blood fats blood lipids blood pressure and
body composition we can’t empower the patient and they
can get better thank you Thanks up all right so we’re taking on all the big
guns we’ve done type-2 diabetes heart disease you know both functional
medicine approaches you’re showing to be able to reverse them when you can get
the patient involved and participatory but there’s one other disease that comes
up a lot it’s not in terms of the numbers but one of the reasons why it’s
so debilitating and this is gone in my family is Alzheimer’s and one of the
reasons why it’s such a problem is because a full time one patient with
Alzheimer’s needs three full time carers and so the numbers of costs just go
through the roof and one of the things that I heard actually last year in a
functional medicine conference is the number one way to get Alzheimer’s is to
care for other people with Alzheimer’s because it’s so stressful right so we’re
sitting in a ridiculous circle you know that’s that’s you know sight the
opposite what are they call the opposite of a virtuous cycle it’s going you know
it’s going downwards because ultimately you just have more and more people that
need to be taking care of people and so in this darkness you know started to
shine last year or a few years ago light and I know dr. David Jones played a big
role in this but last year a book came out called the end of Alzheimer’s by dr.
Dale Bredesen and dr. Dale Bredesen is the first person whose research shows
that it’s possible to reverse mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s and
one of the reasons why he came to partner with functional medicine is
because the functional medicine provider is skilled on understanding the root
cause because what he saw is that there’s different different diseases and
various doctors have gone down to train with dr. Bredesen
with a vision of bringing this back to cities and towns all around the country
and we are very happy to have in the in the room tonight one of those doctors
please welcome dr. Deborah Gordon who bright lights it’s great to be here
tonight with our incredible Ashland community and I particularly have to
thank James for this opportunity to speak because I’ve waited more decades
than I care to admit to say the following two lines to a group of people
you ready one that opera with is sure suta the Drude of March hath perced to
the roote a– so all you old middle english fans will know those are the
opening two lines to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales prologue
I heard them first in my junior year of college and I was smitten The Canterbury
Tales cataloged the journeys of a random group of pilgrims that start out at an
inn is my slide up yeah I think start out it as an inn and they’re making
their spiritual pilgrimage to the Canterbury Cathedral along the way they
share tales that they’ve made up ostensibly fictitious tales but as they
tell the stories it’s very clear that they are revealing everything about
themselves their personalities their background their occupation and as the
tales goes on they’re revealing their reactions to other people’s tales the
little peevishness that they might get after hearing their occupation
discounted the interaction between them impressed me so much with the personal
insight and the complexity far more compelling than what I’d been learning
in my psych and social classes so I ditch that and I became an English
literature major and stuck with it and of course what that meant is when I
went to medical school I had to choose Family Practice as my specialty because
what I do every time when I meet with a new patient is ask them to tell me their
story I want to learn as much as I possibly can about the details in their
life that have brought them to that moment where they’re sitting with me and
sharing with me their concerns about their
nowhere is that more important than when they’re bringing their concerns about
their cognitive health whether they’re interested in preventing or reversing
evidence of cognitive decline I want to know as much as I can about their story
what’s brought them here what’s what’s their exposure been like what are the
relationships like and then I order a whole slew of blood tests get an MRI and
I’m gonna tell you why I do all that as you’re sitting here you have to know
that you have an amazing and a brilliant brain it’s helped you navigate every
step of your life to this point and as you sit here it’s helping you pay
attention or decide not to it’s helping you place a name with that familiar face
you saw when you walked in the door another way that your brain is brilliant
is its requirement for to be fed it loves to be fed it needs vitamins and
minerals it needs a good night’s sleep it needs lots of activity physical
activity and mental activity and it needs rest from both those things it
needs good blood vessels that Michael just talked about to help transport
things to the brain and away from the brain ideally your brain would like a
world free of toxins your brain can’t always get all those things and here’s
another amazing fact about your brain when it can’t get all that it wants it
makes do if you didn’t get a very good sleep last night
your brain will figure out how to rearrange your hormones and your
neurotransmitters and you’ll get through the day if you go on a kooky Ashland
diet for a while and don’t consume any B vitamins your brain will figure out
either some other nutrients that it can use or it will take some part of your
brain that’s less important and temporarily hopefully temporarily shut
it down what that means is it takes the
cumulation of a lot of things to go wrong repeatedly for you to develop a
problem where you can no longer make new memories and your cognitive skills are
declining this is a process that happens slowly over years and very gradually and
it’s very complex which means the process of preventing or reversing that
decline is also complex it starts it always starts doesn’t it with a good
night’s sleep a good night of natural sleep one that’s maybe bolstered by some
they may sound like chemicals but they’re really just elements that your
body makes so it’s melatonin or tryptophan anything your body doesn’t
make it’s not giving you good restful sleep it also starts with a diet what
you eat is very important as the nutritionists have talked about tonight
we start with a plate that has protein and fats on it and we choose them
according to your genetics and your metabolic profile we surround that
protein in fats with a lot of colorful vegetables that’s great and if your
blood sugar can handle it you can have some fruit what you don’t eat or when
you don’t eat is also important so for the patients that I talk with about
their brain and you I encourage you take a 13 to 16 hour overnight fast your
brain will thank you for it as will your body what your brain does during that
time is bring out the cleaning crew it’s called the glymphatic system and it has
to operate in the absence of new food coming in and it cleans out the debris
of the day it might even clean out some of those environmental toxins we should
all be experts on this here do you know how many cars drive through i-5 every
day 35,000 cars we’re breathing their exhaust every day here in Ashland so
your brain ideally to stay young does some kind of mental check
brain HQ up on the slide is the best documented way that you can challenge
your brain and measure its abilities and see if they’re improving or declining
you should also keep active physical life and that means yes walking or
rowing or cycling a little bit every day and a couple times a week doing it
really quickly getting some intervals in and a couple other days a week lifting
some heavy objects ideally with somebody showing you how to do it
chill it’s really also very valuable to learn some way of getting your body your
brain to be quiet not empty it’s different but quiet so whether you
meditate or find a meditation app on a smartphone I encourage my patients to do
this and the last picture there so we we take all that blood from you to see what
your metabolic markers are because there’s a host of supplements that can
help compensate for things that have maybe gone awry and that’s a picture of
fish oil and fischels almost always a part of this protocol so this is complex
this is a lot to do whether you’re thinking about preventing or reversing
cognitive decline you can’t do it alone there’s always a circle of hands that
starts with a person very close to the patient and it might be a spouse or a
loved one or a good friend someone who can help you along and partner with you
on this journey because it really is a journey and just like the pilgrims in
the Canterbury tale there will be challenges and surprises and great
rewards in my practice we also take a group approach we need a team so there’s
more than one doctor we have health coaches that we work with and health
coaches help the patients to prioritize their goals and the health coaches help
us identify whether maybe we need another person on the team do we need
chef’s to help someone chop vegetables do we need a younger member of their
family to show them how to use the computer so they can play those games
again or do we need a nutritionist to help them chart their path and a life
without sandwiches and sweets you notice there was no bread or sugar on that
dietary plate and I think a lot of the team I work with it started with Dale
Bredesen and continues and this is another one of the blessings of the
internet I had a great exchange with another doctor using the Bredesen
protocol in California today and we exchanged the medical research on
introducing hormones and advanced age for their cognitive benefit it’s been a
tremendous rewarding community for me to work with and working with patients
implementing this community we’re together with practitioners and patients
and the world around us it’s a real pleasure and an honor to be
creating a community of health thank you thanks dr. Gordon so you can see you
know this is this is sort of an example of what’s happening all around the
country what we’re trying to encourage is to bring together providers to bring
together teams so that we can work together to work on these really complex
chronic diseases so next up it’s my great pleasure you know we again
standing on the shoulders of giants have been said this evening you know we have
done 51 episodes of the functional forum and up until right now have never had
the chairman emeritus or the Institute for functional medicine on the on the
show you can see tonight just what an impact if we’re talking about
interconnected medicine look at the web of connections that have come from this
next man please welcome dr. David Jones now you’re gonna keep and and please
keep it there you can see me and so you don’t heat me put up there I have
prepared some nice slides for you because I’d like to discuss the journey
of helium how many here are practitioners health care practitioners
so the there’s about 50 50 I’ve been here for over 45 years it’s been a
privilege to be in Ashland and what I want to start this with is what I’ve
learned in that 45 years the first is the secret to the care of the patient is
caring for the patient and I mean really caring for the patient because being a
practitioner is complex to be successful where’s the energy to do that well the
energy comes from the patient because the patient is somebody that if you
don’t care for you won’t dig as deep as you will if you do care for them so this
was a statement that was made almost a hundred years ago at the graduation of
Harvard’s Medical School and dr. Francis Peabody was one of the first scientific
doctors and started one of the first scientific journals and yet what he
spoke to was what he learned the last few years of his life as he died slowly
from cancer was that answers come from caring it doesn’t necessarily come from
the objective side of our brain that we call science we live in an era where the
objective world is preeminent and everything that we do science is the
king of the kingdom in terms of assessing
objective reality and yet my clinical experience is that the subjective
reality of patients life is probably more important than the objective
reality that we assess how we live how we feel how we love how we eat how we
relate it’s going to make a decision deep inside of us whether we want to be
here and if we don’t want to be here there’s plenty of ways of leaving the
planet heart attack quick and your ism stroke quick cancer slow but you leave
the planet and it’s respectable that has to do with a subjective reality and if
the molecules are there and your deep subjective reality is that you want to
be here that you have reasons that drive human beings like love caring community
the things that we’re talking about in terms of connectedness then you will use
those molecules to help you be here it’s not the other way around
from my 45 years of dealing with patients I can put molecules in them I
can have them by molecules that are supposed to do certain things and often
they don’t and why don’t they there’s a subjective reality to our life which has
to be taken into account now the corollary to that in terms of
the practitioners is caring for the patient requires really really knowing
the patient and I mean in domains of their life that can’t be evaluated or
even begun to understand in a five minute visit this was a wonderful book
the nature of healing because what I want to move to as we go is a study we
did about healing so the mandate is the cure if possible curing occurred
very infrequently and we celebrated if by some chance you got hepatitis C not
only can I be controlled it can be cured now I don’t need all ten fingers to talk
about huge cures that have occurred during my 45 years as a physician
because mainly what we do is we deal with the issue of healing and mainly
it’s healing suffering and understanding where the suffering is coming from in
the particular person we’re dealing now and there’s really only one goal and
that’s the well-being of the patient and so what do I mean by that well just
happen to have an answer patients have a sense of well-being when they are able
to pursue their purposes their purposes that’s a very subjective statement and
achieve their goals again very subjective in life’s various domains now
understanding the patient’s domains understanding the notion of domains the
social determinants of health are very well worked out now in some cities what
bus stop or subway stop you get off on if you live there is a predictor of how
long you live and that’s the generality as opposed to the specific there’s
according to that subjective reality of that patient or that person that those
social determinants have greater or less effect so this is the question I’ve
asked myself from the moment I moved here because I move right out of
training how do we deal how do I deal with puzzling questions that patients
bring me I was sitting at my desk at the about two years stent and I looked at
the schedule of patients that I had seen that day and I realize half of them
should have stayed home because I was seeing the side effects from medication
and what was I trained to be a purveyor of drugs and if you think for a moment
conventional medicine is not controlled by the pharmaceutical industry then you
are not in a position to take care yourself and that’s that’s what I faced
as a doctor at two years that list and then the other one on my dust at the end
of the day was who’s coming tomorrow so the question I asked myself do you know
who to call and say don’t come because I don’t have anything but drugs that it’s
not going to help you and I realized I didn’t know enough and that’s when I
began a search for what how could we enlarge that portfolio of understanding
of where we really made a difference and that was where the birthing of
functional medicine came from because I was lucky enough to meet Jeff bland who
was a very inventive about chemists and then he came to Ashland every quarter
and we delved into nutritional biochemistry and then it just blossomed
after that under what we’d call functional medicine now but the driver
was always always always the secret to the care of a patient is really really
caring for the patient otherwise it’s too damn hard to do it’s tiring but and
this took decades for me to understand if I really trusted what I just said and
could stop at the door and say for a moment
can you stop thinking about all the things that you’re expected to do and
think about the persons in that room and ask yourself the question are you quiet
enough to actually listen to the patient without giving an answer to move along
but really together put the food on the table what you hear from them without
being directive in my life as a practitioner changed because I stopped
being the Answer Man and I got to be the observer of miracles a miracle something
is not expected it’s not expected to walk into a room
and ask the patient what they think I li I had this experience where I was
working with a patient with a very serious medical problem and I tried
everything that we were thinking about in the early origins of functional
medicine pharmacology nothing helped so I looked at her and I said I’m flummoxed
that’s a big medical word for I don’t know what the hell’s going on here and
I’m not helping you and I said I feel so flemmings are gonna step out of the room
and I’m gonna ask dr. Brown who’s here today visiting and ask him to come in
and interview you so the room walk back in myself is dr. Brown and said dr.
Jones is flummoxed and I’m not sure he asked you the following question but
what do you think is causing it and that’s when I learned that work is a lot
easier if you actually create a context where someone trusts you enough to tell
you and it was a very she was in a situation where they had kids she needed
the work that she’s employed by but it was a very onerous employment
relationship so my prescription for her was to call my banker and after she said
that they had a business plan that no one believed and the banker put her in
touch and she got a small business loan and they’ve been very successful and I
see her downtown every once in a while and she’s never had another nother any
incidence of that problem so what did I learn from that the the secret to the
care of the patient is caring for the patients and really really caring for
the patient enough that you get yourself out of the equation other than you know
a lot but you have to let them select what you lay on the table as
possibilities and they will select because they live
in their world 360 days of every year and they they have the wisdom if you can
create a context so that is a great lead-in to helium
let’s see this is what I think is very well spoken in terms of why we’ve lost
the art of healing healing is replaced with treating caring is supplanted by
managing and the art of listening is taken over by technology doctors no
longer minister to a distinctive person but concern themselves with fragmented
mental functioning biological parts let’s take care of the diabetic down in
room 332 for instance would be one of the examples of them the distressed
human being is frequently absent from the transition for transaction because
they’re not allowed into the room in an authentic way this was a wonderful book
there was a this story behind this study was at Vanderbilt they went in the
larger area of Vanderbilt and asked who in town do patients talk about as having
a healing presence and they rounded up 50 of these people and they said you’re
acknowledged as being having a healing presence in our community what do you
think is the reason for that well this was actually the least interesting of
the books because the second book came out and what they did was they took the
50 practitioners announced them give us the name of five people that you think
have had an experience of healing not that you did it but it had an experience
of healing they interviewed them and look at what the people said I think
this is so revealing we think that what we do as clinicians as we’re a fixer of
discrete problems there’s ten important things there and only one of them is
what we think we’re supposed to be doing because the other ones are what create a
context where transformational processes can occur
so we did a study where we studied the life of 23 patients 23 people that had
horrible things happen in their life in fact they were so horrible that every
one of them had considered committing suicide and in studying the extensive
interviews and transcripts of their travail we came up with some very
important key things what we found in the healing journey is that when
something happens that a person is suffering from it’s there’s an emergent
property to those that healed in fact we had trouble getting the paper published
that finally was published in the British Medical Journal because we
didn’t have a cohort because when he asked us where’s your cohort well these
are people that commit suicide it’s hard to get their opinion after they commit a
suicide so this is a group that did not commit suicide and to get to the bottom
line because I see James over there with a hook the emergent properties are
really there’s an iterative process where the person has people in their
life where they they gather as they go along different skills for handling
their self abusive behavior in helium that keeps them from healing and every
one there was a reframing of the experience that they carried like a
wound every day that was one of them another one was that not one of them
didn’t have someone that really really cared for them and unfortunately that
someone was only two people out of the 23 that had a health care provider that
really really cared it was most often someone in their life
and so I’m about to come out the stage because it doesn’t matter whether you’re
a patient a physician health care giver it’s the connectedness we have with one
another that creates healing and it was that connectedness that helped these 23
people resume a life very often uh very they become someone in service once they
reframe their life in a way and go through enough iterations of that
process that they become successful and I think I should speak to one of the
important people for one of these people it was his dog because he said I
couldn’t commit suicide because it would take care of my dog and I don’t have
anybody in my life that has given me more love than my dog
so this brings me in mind of a statement from the South mice one of my son
in-laws is from the south and he said this is a Commons homily I wish I was
half the man my dog thinks I am and with that I hope that I’m half the man that I
thought I could be standing up for her in front of you thanks so much dr. Jones
thank you wonderful thank you alright so hopefully just seeing profound layers of
interconnectedness and interconnected medicine the last speaker that we can
have on stage is from Asante which one of the big hospital systems here we
wanted to have something that would bring this together because we’ve said
for a long time on the functional forum that community is the Guru of the future
please welcome Sheila Clos good afternoon good evening all of that
good stuff phone I came in it was afternoon now I bet by now it’s evening
it is a true pleasure and honor to be here this evening and asked to do this
by some of my heroes in medicine the stones and and dr. Jones I’m not a
practitioner in functional medicine but I’m a patient in functional medicine I
noticed that I can’t speak to these David I’m gonna keep moving these along
and we’ll get to my slides eventually all right it’s perfect as a patient in
functional medicine I just want to applaud all of you who are practitioners
and functional medicine for really leading the way on behave on behalf of
patients like me I’ve benefited from your practices and I encourage you to
keep doing it because it does make a difference and I’m here to tell you that
firsthand I’m the chief executive officer for
Santa Ashland Community Hospital here in our community I’m also on the board of
directors for Southern Oregon University and the board of directors for the
chamber of commerce and on that board I chair the health and well-being
initiative and partnership and I don’t share that with you to share a little
bit about my resume but rather I share that with you because in all of those
avenues and arenas in my life I’ve had the opportunity to see the connection
between the community and the environment around us and the impact it
has on the health and well-being of our students of our employees whether
they’re employees with small businesses or large businesses I see how the impact
our community has on the citizens that live in this community as well as even
some of the patience that we take care of within our
Hospital this awareness between the connection between our community and the
health and well-being occurred for me about three years ago when the director
of our Chamber of Commerce tapped me on the shoulder and said hey we have this
project see we have this problem that’s starting to manifest itself in our small
businesses within this community and we’d like you to participate on this
project and help to identify and resolve the issues of employee health within our
small businesses within our city employees within our school systems and
I said sure this sounds like a great project for an administrator of a
hospital why not well this small group like any small
groups do they started with gathering data and we started by going to the
business leaders and interviewing our local business leaders and asking them
about the challenges that they were facing regarding their employees we
heard really interesting stories about how their employees health issues were
impacting the productivity of their businesses but it was more than just the
health issues of the employees it was the issues of the employees children and
their parents that they were taking care of and it went beyond physical health
issues it included mental health issues and
went beyond that they told us stories about challenges their employees were
having around financial concerns and those financial challenges then made it
difficult for them to get to work and challenges around transportation and
housing and then these small business owners particularly where we’re talking
about how as a small business owner you’re not only running your business
but you’re also the counselor for your employees because many of the employees
didn’t have a great support system networks that could help them during
some of these hardships and challenges so all of these interviews brought us to
the conclusion that we had a big problem and this is a problem that we decided we
needed to tackle because it was impacting the vitality of our businesses
within this community you didn’t have employees were showing up to work and or
if they did show up to work and they were in you know bad morale issues for
small businesses it was the difference between staying open or closing and so
we decided we were gonna take on this issue of trying to figure out how to
deal with these really diverse problems for our businesses within this community
but we knew it was huge how are we gonna tackle this elephant well fortunately
just as we were trying to decide what to do along came the Oregon healthiest
state initiative a couple years ago our governor at the time kicked this
initiative off because he believed that it was important to improve the health
and well-being of all Oregonians you see Oregon ranks number 35 in terms of
overall well-being not the greatest place to rank in there in our nation so
through this initiative with the state we learned about the Gallup Healthways
well-being index there’s a concept of overall well-being well-being is a
concept that captures the important aspects of how people feel about and
experience their daily lives and it includes more than just physical
well-being there are five elements to the overall well-being index including
having purpose and liking what you do each day and being motivate and
motivated to achieve goals having a social well being which means having
supportive relationships in your life overall well-being also includes
financial well-being being able to manage your economic life
to reduce stress and insecurity which includes food insecurity managing money
living within your means managing your stress and you’re worried about money
and overall well-being the last element is community and liking where you live
feeling safe where you live and having pride and where you live so you like the
rest of us may be asking yourself why does well-being matter well according to
the studies by Gallup individuals who are thriving and physical health alone
are still 68 percent more likely to miss work due to poor health conversely those
individuals who are thriving in all five elements of well-being are 36 times more
likely to recover during a hardship it’s about resiliency there are two times
more likely to exhibit the adaptability to change and we know in life there’s a
lot of change isn’t there they’re 23 percent more likely to donate to charity
and 43 percent more likely to volunteer so when you think about a vital
community you want people who are thriving in all five of these elements
and it’s through this well-being index that we started to see the connection
between people’s health and well-being in the environment around us that
concept was further solidified as we learned about a study that was done by
the University of Wisconsin where they were looking at the determinants of what
makes a population healthy so I think somebody said it earlier the social
determinants of health well only 20% of what influences a populations
health is related to medical care it’s kind of disappointing for those of us
are in medical care but more importantly we learned through this study that 80%
of a health of populations health or determinants the things that determine a
papapapa health of a population are things like behaviors socio-economic
factors and the environment around us so another way to say that is that behavior
is shaped by the social culture and a physical environment around us and that
impacts our health I think for for a minute about your own health your own
health and that think about how diet impacts your own health and now think
about how challenging it is to manage your diet and the diet that you’re
managing is either easier or more difficult depending on the environment
that surrounds you think about going into a grocery store as you go into a
grocery store that’s al and mindful of areas of good decisions or bad decisions
I think for instance if we change the way we had our grocery stores set up so
that those the grocery store was laid out in a way that it was easy for us to
make good decisions about what we were going to purchase think about your
physical exercise we’ve engineered physical activity out of our daily
living how many of you walked to school about 90 percent of you how many of you
do your children or your grandchildren walk to school about 15 to 20 percent of
you in the room we’ve engineered sidewalks out of our
communities we’ve engineer
exercise out of our daily living so as we started realizing this we recognized
that if we were going to improve the health and the well-being of our
community we needed to be able to tackle that at a community level to change the
environment where we all live where we work where we play where we go to school
and that collaboration is key because no one stakeholder in this community has
all of the answers nor do we have all of the influence to ensure that we
re-engineer a healthy environment around us so I’m really excited that the
Ashland Board of Chamber Board of Directors has endorsed a community-wide
effort and we now have officials from our city from our public health
department from Southern Oregon University and many of our businesses
within this community coming together with one goal and one vision and that is
to create an environment or a community where the healthy choice is the easy
choice where the financial well-being social connectedness a sense of purpose
and pride in our community can be maximized we know that this is going to
take years this is a change in our and our environment it’s a change in our
culture but we believe that there is a benefit to that we believe that if we
improve the well-being of our citizens in this community it will have an impact
on reducing medical costs it will have an impact on improving outcome and
productivity within our community and that will in impact the total economic
vitality of this community so I’m excited to be part of this and I’m
excited to be in a community or a group of people like you in this room tonight
have such a care for this community and the improvement of the overall
well-being that you take the time to come to forums like this so thank you
once again for this opportunity and I look forward to working with you in this
community wide initiative Thank You Sheila thank you so much all right
we’ve almost wrapping up here but um it’s been such an honor to bring all
these practitioners together to share these stories with you and hopefully set
up what is a very exciting future for the future of Medicine where we can
shift from the old story of separation to the new story of interconnectedness
and the plan that Sheila just laid out for Ashland is actually a good plan
because it’s working in other places if you’re British like me you know that
Froome is said Froome and not from– but in Froome they say the town that’s found
a potent cure for illnesses community and Froome in Somerset has seen a
dramatic fall in emergency hospital admissions since it began this process
and you see in the bottom right corner there the Blue Zone so the Blue Zone
research that went around the world looking for the healthiest communities
they brought back those ideas to a town in Minnesota and health costs went down
by 40% now the problem with that who do those benefits accrue to if you reduce
healthcare costs by 40 percent who do those benefits accrue to the insurance
company right we have a fundamental issue with interconnectedness in that
the basis for how we interact with the medical system is built on a story of
separation which is health insurance and you can see it in that diagram there and
so ultimately you know what we’ve been looking for all the way through is been
looking at what are structures that have the right incentives and a few years ago
when I first you know for the first eight years that I lived in America
because I was relatively healthy and I had a lot of doctor friends I was
uninsured I was uninsured for the first eight years that I lived in America and
then I had a child now I realized that the value proposition was probably not
the same I needed to get some insurance but it’s
all very expensive I lived in New York and so you know one of the things that I
came across as I was doing the research with these things called a Christian
health cost-sharing ministry has anyone ever heard of those rights oh yeah you
guys are smart you’ve heard of it so the Christian health cost sharing ministry
there’s actually five of them there’s the four on the left and then Liberty on
the right so the thing that they have all in common is that they were given an
exemption to the ACA mandate so if you had one of these things you didn’t have
to pay the tax penalty and they will wage cheaper and you had to you know
they’re way cheaper and the incentives ran in the right way because if you it
moved from an idea of personal responsibility to an idea of community
responsibility but you had to be Christian to sign up and for that reason
and a few others it never reached the mainstream even though more than 500,000
Americans today use Christian health ministries and I thought to myself all
the way a long time wouldn’t it be amazing if our community the
practitioners could start their own health cost-sharing ministry but it
wouldn’t be a ministry because it’s not it’s not you know it’s not Christian but
wouldn’t it be amazing if we could build something like that I looked into and I
found out that there were only a certain amount of exemptions given and even
though we’ve got a healthy community of practitioners who you know take those
take health care seriously and take their own health seriously that a
perfect fit for that kind of thing we couldn’t do it and we actually if you’ve
been following us for a long time you know in 2015 we actually created a
product with Liberty House share which you’ll see over there and then Donald
Trump 90 days ago signed his tax bill and although that’s been unbelievably
controversial in all different kinds of ways my unique understanding of the
situation based on the fact that I’ve been in functional medicine and using
those Christian health cost-sharing cooperatives is that right now we have
the opportunity to do it because the individual mandate has gone away we’re
not forced to buy health insurance as a result of that and so for the next three
years there is an opportunity for us to create something truly unique and it
goes beyond it goes beyond a health cost-sharing ministry does and
these were these were the the details there and so what I’m gonna what we’re
proposing and what we’re going to be starting to launch today and we’re going
to be launching and talking about all the way through our tour is the idea of
a health cooperative it’s more than a health cost-sharing ministry because
we’re not just sharing the costs we’re actually sharing the health we need to
incentivize people to get healthy and more than anything else we need to
incentivize people to help each other there is no incentive in medicine that
has been a any you know evolutionary imperative for the last million years
for us to support each other and that incentive is not here in medicine and it
needs to be brought back so for the next seven months and including this tour
we’re going to be going on and talking about this beginning of a new health
cooperative that we’re launching here and I had to launch in Ashland because
it’s so it’s so aligned with the way that you guys think about the world so
if you’re watching this video you can go and click below and sign up and I
created a book called the top 10 ways to save money in health care if we’re going
to be a cooperative the first thing is friends don’t let friends pay retail for
medicine and as an example you know you know PP you if you’re paying if you just
go to a user insurance to get a lab test like say homocysteine you could pay
seven hundred and thirty seven dollars but if you go directly to the labs which
you can in 47 states in the nation you should you could pay $17 fifty that’s a
saving of 98% and if you have a high deductible plan you’re paying it anyway
so you might as well work it out so we are going to be this is the new vision
for medicine new is all about combining the right incentives with the right care
we’ve got the functional integrated medicine community we’ve worked out over
last year how to scale it up by using health coaches and we’re going to be
going city to city to 40 cities all across this country by the time that
open enrollment starts on November 1st want to have 10 to 15,000 people at
least that are committed to joining the first health cooperative and set a new
vision for the way that medicine is done you know we’ve said for a long time
the next functional Aurum is is is the fifth or the seventh
of May and we’re going to be going into a deeper you know we’ve said for a long
time on the functional forum that community is the Guru of the future that
tick net harm quote well ladies and gentlemen community is the Guru of the
now thank you very much I do

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