Is this a Scholarly Journal Article?

Is this a Scholarly Journal Article?


So you’ve found a source that you want to
use for your assignment but you’ve also been told that you should only use scholarly journal
articles. So how do you know if the source you’ve found
is actually a scholarly journal article? To find out, answer the following two questions: Is the source from a peer-reviewed journal? And is it an article? First, make sure that the journal in which
your article is published is peer reviewed. Some search tools offer a one-click option
to narrow your search results to those articles classified as peer reviewed. However, these options are not always accurate. A more reliable approach involves checking
the website for the journal itself. Journals will often identify themselves as
peer-reviewed on their site, though sometimes they’ll use the word “refereed,” which is
just another word for peer reviewed. Start by navigating to the section of the
website that describes the journal’s mission. This section is often labelled using phrases
like “About us,” “Aims and Scope,” or “Mission statement.” Journals will often use these sections to
highlight their status as peer reviewed because it brings with it a certain prestige. For example, the journal Ethnic and Racial
Studies describes itself as a publication in which all articles “are peer reviewed to
a high standard.” The journal may also mention its peer review
process in the section of its website that outlines the process for submitting articles
for publication. This section is sometimes called “submission
guidelines” or “instructions for authors.” Second, make sure that your source is actually
an article. In addition to publishing full-length research
articles, journals sometimes publish other types of content like book reviews, editorials,
and commentary. You may find evidence that what you’re looking
at is an article in the source itself. For example, some articles identify themselves
as articles in their introductory paragraphs. Similarly, book reviews and editorials often
begin with headings that indicate what type of source they are. If you’re still unsure, check the headings
in the table of contents for the issue of the journal in which your source is published. Let’s say you’re looking at the source called
“From heroes to vulnerable victims” which is published in volume 36, issue 7 of the
journal Ethnic and Racial Studies. To view the table of contents, navigate to
the website for the journal, then to the page for the specific issue that contains your
source. The table of contents for this issue has the
headings “Original Articles” and “Book Reviews.” Our source is found under the heading “Original
Articles,” which confirms that the source is indeed an article. In sum, if your source is from a peer-reviewed
journal and if it’s actually an article, chances are your source is a scholarly journal article. Keep in mind, however, that there’s a lot
of variation in the ways in which journal content is published, so the methods described
in this video may not work in all instances. If you’re still unsure about any of the sources
you’ve found — or you have any questions at all — just ask us.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *