March 2018 CCDA Listening Forum – Coffee Chat with Legislators

March 2018 CCDA Listening Forum – Coffee Chat with Legislators


Assemblyman Lackey was first elected in 2000 – thank you – Was first elected in the state assembly in 2014 representing the 36th Assembly District, which encompass portions of Kern County, Los Angeles County, and San Bernardino. He is the vice chair of the Assembly Committee of Public Safety and was appointed to CCDA in 2016. Commissioner Lackey has been a leader on providing strong public safety policies and has been an advocate for affordable taxes educational improvement and job growth through private sector economic development. Commissioner Lackey has been a champion to combat the growing problems of drug driving and state funding to support programs for individuals with developmental disabilities. Before joining the assembly he was a special education teacher and served 28 years in the California Highway Patrol And I will say I’m so proud that quickly after becoming a Commissioner for CCDA he partnered with CCDA and had a Capitol briefing at with the chiefs of staff and This was a tremendous support for us and very fruitful that we were able to develop a lot of Relationships because of what you did for us, so we thank you and we look forward to that partnership and continued partnership. So now let’s start giving some hand claps and welcome [applause] And this gentleman we just met recently and he is our newest commissioner assemblyman Jim Frazier He was just within a month appointed to the board, but he actually Was elected in 2012 to represent assembly district 11, which encompasses Solano, Contra Costa, and Sacramento counties This gentleman has a longtime advocate for the disability community. It is reflective in his work with East Contra Costa County first all abilities playground co-sponsorship of the cast for kids fishing derby his support with the establishment of Antioch special haven multi-sensor room which helps individual autism brain injury developmental disabilities dementia and PTSD. And he was awarded also for his service in Northern California for the Special Olympics. As I mentioned I just met our newest Commissioner, and I told him and him in his office I thought I went to the lottery when I met so. I was like we just want something here for sure so again Let’s welcome our newest Commissioner, Commissioner Assemblyman Jim Frazier [applause] And before I introduce our last representative, legislative representative I’d like to share with you all that both assemblymen Jim Cooley and Timothy Grayson had wished to be here. They wanted to be a part of this day, but had conflicting or impeding commitments that were made them unable to be here but I did want to give recognition to them because they showed a strong interest in working with CCDA. Last but not least on this presentation is a representative from Senator Pan’s office today and that is deputy district director Joe Debbs and Deputy Debbs has been a community servant for 40-plus years he had said more, but I said you know we don’t want to age you too much in that description, but he has worked with various legislative leaders prior to joining Senator Pan’s office three years ago, such as US Representative Maxine Waters. With that he has worked nationally as well as locally as a public servant. Locally has chaired for several years for the County Planning Commission in Oak Park. Deputy Director Debbs has served as a advocate for the low-income and the underserved population of our community and has reached out to CCDA to begin opportunities to develop educational outreach efforts on behalf of Senator Pan’s office. We at this time would also like to acknowledge all the legislative staffing that’s in the room as well, so if those who are here raise your hand give us a yes. Thank you. [Applause] And there are those who are also probably listening on the phone. But we just want to truly acknowledge all those who are participating and wanted to give appropriate introduction as best we could at this time. So with that said I just want to again, thank you all for coming Thank the staff for putting this together all those who’ve been working and still on their job right now. And now I like to what I’ll further adieu introduce and present to you all our Facilitator for this coffee chat and that is Eileen. Jo yes yeah, thank you, thank you so much Good evening good to see you. I’m gonna scoot around here, so we wanted to start the conversation First by inviting our commissioners to share a little bit about what they heard today. We had many many participants in the room this afternoon in conversation about the disability parking programs So we wanted to have them share a little bit of what we heard and then we want to hear from you. So Commissioner McGuinness you want to go help us out here. Gentlemen I’ve been asked to summarize what we heard today Before I attempt to do that and I hope I do it justice wanted to just let you know Who is in the room and who is on the phone we heard from today. There were nonprofit organizations there were government entities representing both municipalities and parking organizations there were business interests who were represented and there were also individuals who came because parking issues affect their daily lives people with disabilities parents of children with disabilities I was really pleased at what a broad cross-section of constituents came and shared their opinions and their thoughts with us and so I feel a real responsibility that I am trying to summarize what they said to you and convey you their thoughts. And so I hope that my fellow commissioners will help me out if I leave out something that’s important. We had a panel that was comprised of people from the City of Sacramento parking division people from the DMV and a representative of the Center for Independent Living facilities and They talked about various aspects of disabled parking programs and the DMV representatives were Really the most interesting to the people in the room and on the phone because the DMV talked about how the fact that had been Audited its parking placard program had been audited and how much fun that was for them. And how much they learned as a result and your tax dollars at work. It turned out to be a very productive audit for them they learn what had not been going right. And it sounded as if they have made a lot of very productive changes, which the people who were listening very much appreciated After we had that panel speak we broke into small groups and every person in the room and every person on the phone had the opportunity to go to each of the focus groups and give their opinion on three topics. The three topics included a discussion of parking access itself. A discussion of the DMV parking placard program and its management and any discussion of innovation what kind of changes would folks like to see So I am going to touch on each one of those three topics and try and summarize What the responses were. People were asked, What did they like? What was working? and What would they like to see change? So in terms of parking access itself I think universally everyone was thrilled to see that DMV and affiliated law enforcement was doing more enforcement against placard abuse That was one of the things that came out of the audit. The DMV was committed to doing more of it and everybody was Thrilled to that because people who legitimately have placards really have difficulty finding parking and people who don’t don’t want to see people parking when and so they can’t get a meter themselves so One of the people one of the things that came out Was that people would like to actually see more opportunity for disabled parking more scoping expansion of the number of disabled designated parking spots because as I’m sure you’re aware as our population ages more and more people fall into the category of Mobility disability and it’s harder and harder to find Disability parking spots.They also saw that there’s a problem with What under title three would be called public accommodations that is private businesses not having the number of disabled parking spots they’re supposed to have and when they do have them not enforcing them. So one of the things that folks asked Is if the DMV and law enforcement would both educate these private businesses and would assist with enforcement of Disabled parking laws on private property There also came up and these were representative government agencies who said this they shall remain nameless That there is a problem with government agencies not having sufficient disabled parking spaces at government buildings and that this was a system-wide problem and Finally, folks said that there was a problem with street parking that cities either not providing sufficient street parking for people with disabilities or Doing something like placing it in the middle of the block or not providing curb cuts so that when a person with a disability does park they have to travel in the street. And they’re at risk of of course being hit by a car while they’re trying to find a way up onto the curb So while there was a lot of praise for the good work the DMV is doing there was a lot of room for improvement On the question of management of the placard program itself We did have one person who commented that he had just had his permanent placard renewed under the new process which is Which is interrogating Applications more strictly and he said that it went very smoothly, and he very much appreciated it so again good government at work There were a lot of questions about what doctors do and how much of a judgement call they have when they go about Approving a placard for a person just deciding whether they have a disability and whether they have a need for a placard The person at the DMV said there’s a little bit of pushback from organizations that represent doctors not wanting to be involved with policing and enforcing their members and so the DMV wasn’t sure whether it was going to be able to work with with organizations of doctors who work on enforcement from that end But the people who are on the phone and the people who were in the audience certainly wanted doctors at least to be educated about what comprises a disability and about the problems of abuse of Placards by doctors the problems of doctors not sufficiently asking questions before issuing a placard They also noted that sometimes caregivers and use it IHSS workers will take the placard of a person who legitimately deserves one and use it When there when the when the disabled person is not in the car so they they identified that is another Another way that that disabled placards can sometimes be misused And then on the on the third topic of innovation there’s actually quite a bit of discussion One issue that came up That well there was discussion on sort of both sides of the issue is integrating RFID or photos into placards or Putting little disabled ISA wheelchairs onto the driver’s licenses of People who have disabled placards and of course on the other side of that are issues privacy because although You might you need a placard you don’t necessarily want to show everybody that you’re a person with a disability Every time you produce your driver’s license so the there was a tension between Trying to find ways of ensuring that only people who legitimately Possess a placard are using it and also Trying to maintain the privacy of people who do have placards There was a lot of discussion of trying to educate both the public and placard users. One of the suggestions that came up was improving public awareness I know the DMV is doing public service announcements And they’re trying to say trying to educate people about saving the space for people Who legitimately need a disabled parking spot but There’s also discussion about making people aware of the differences between a disabled spot and a van accessible Disabled spot so that if you have a placard and you don’t need the van accessible spot. You just use the regular spot and do people asked if the DMV would actually produce educational materials for people who have placards that when they receive their placard they also receive education about the responsible way to use their placard not allowing people who are friends or family to use their placard and how they can use their placard properly There was also suggestion that people who can’t find metered parking be allowed to park in garages There was a discussion about programs in other states apparently Illinois and the city of Portland have a two-tiered parking system where people with mobility Disabilities are allowed to park in metered spaces, but they pay They they’re allowed to park longer, but they still pay and people who also have agility problems in their upper limbs don’t have to pay at all because they can’t manipulate the issues with the meters That I think that was an attempt to respond to the person from the City of Sacramento who was talking about the need for For you know municipal funding to come out of parking spaces I hope that I covered everything if I haven’t I’m sure someone will educate the legislature. Thank you for listening And I’m looking forward to hearing from you Thank you very much Commissioner [Applause] That was an amazing summary of a lot of conversations, so thank you very much And I know you all have to leave pretty soon, so I want to make sure you have time We’ll start with You Assemblyman Frazier You can either react to what you heard and talk a little bit about what you’re doing in the legislature around this So there have been I’m the chairman of the Transportation Committee in California for the assembly and So there have been there has been legislation that’s been in my committee that and has started to address these issues with the placards Not only accessibility, but also forgery of the placards and whatnot and the misuse and and the The physicians also, and how they administer them so I think it’s an ongoing process the Hill bill was brought in to Statute I believe and the Gatto bill was held in committee But I think one of the things that we have to look at when we introduce legislation on these matters is to be very segmented and take steps to a Plan for success instead of trying to throw a bunch of items at the wall and see what sticks pick the physicians or pick the the Accessibility or pick the the time slots and make a plan to get to it But if you try to do all at one time in one bill there you have too many factions it might be against something and so I Think it has to be a methodical approach on going forward You know we’ve talked to business. We’ve talked to in my office We’ve talked to the advocates who Have the have the placards so I think it’s just an ongoing thing to work towards a process that has a balance for everybody and then also Local government has to be part of the process when they look at the planning process of future development, but also in in hindsight how they might be Helpful in accomplishing for private development Who you know who already has established, how we can help them achieve accessibility also so that I mean it’s a multi prong approach and that Just needs a very very prescriptive plan to get to You know the objective Yeah, the good news is I believe that Our society and our government is engaged in disability awareness improvement. If you look back just a short distance ago things were much much worse and so progress is incremental when it comes with government and public policy and Being a person that has My father suffered a severe stroke for the last 12 years of his life and so I understand very clearly the challenges associated with with mobility challenges And so we’ve come a long way we have a long way to go, and I think part of the what What was said by my colleague Assemblymember Frazier Working with local governments as a very powerful piece of trying to Bringing real solutions. We can pass all the laws we want up here but unless they’re implemented and they’re enforced they mean very little and so it’s really really important that we get the cooperative effort and and to try to communicate in a very genuine manner not be pounding on the desk until it actually comes to that but But to try to work in a cooperative spirit and to let people know the genuine Demand for some of these changes that need to take place, and I think that we can Get to where we need to get but it’s going to take the genuine efforts of this group Who need to advocate because it won’t just happen on its own It has to be pushed and you have to advocate but the way you advocate is as important as your advocacy So let’s let’s work cooperatively and let’s work smartly And I think that we have a lot of good things to look forward to for our mobility disabled folks I forgot to tell Angela. I was a caregiver for ten years and During that that period of time I learned a lot of things as relates to people not being able to access I learned that one time I was on crutches and When I went in to The bathroom I couldn’t reach things Right, and I couldn’t get in and out doors, and I was saying how do people maneuver in and out of these private buildings when you don’t have adequate access or Trying to make your way in and out of a bathroom, which came so natural to me, but after I was on crutches It was like dang You know we have a real problem Let me also say too, Senator Richard pan is a doctor he’s a pediatrician so a lot of times people think that Legislators kind of stay in their own lane when it comes to a specific subject, but that is not true They all have various interests They come in and out and they have varied interests especially when it comes to the public because all of their districts Have some of the same problems and that’s people and So it’s it’s good to see legislators who have various interests and who sit on the various commitees Today I heard some things which enlightened me. I was really happy because this listening tour was the educational thing for me and Many of the things that people talk about really don’t need legislation It just needs enforcement you mentioned it all it needs is enforcement we need to to shore up the laws we have Already on the books and we need to start paying attention to them and then start enforcing them Yes, some of the other innovative things we talked about they’re a little draconian They might take a legislation because they’ve been dealing with some constitutional issues, but I think for the most part I think if we all work together because it was a diverse group of people that was in that room today And I think if we were all – we all left out of there with something Educational and if we all had a mission in a charge, I think we could get a lot of things done Thank you very much So in a moment I’m gonna invite the Commissioners to ask questions of the panelists, but I do have a follow-up Assemblyman Frazier you kind of imply that all of this is about striking a balance right? Business needs the disability community needs Local government, so how do you strike a balance between? Access, accountability and enforcement in the disability parking program. How do you do that? Well, it’s kind of like what you started this morning. You have to have the players in the room you have to have everybody Talking about what is important to them. Okay? And be very prescriptive, and then – I’m a general contractor by trade So you know I’ve been in the construction industry for 35 years I use the subcontractor model where all of my experts my subcontractors Helped me build my houses, okay? And so we would need the experts in the field and and the advocates to share and then you construct a plan and And you know sometimes it takes compromise also, not always is everybody gonna come out happy but there might be a plan you know that comes to Some kind of solution and going forward and doesn’t mean it has to be cast in stone you can adapt from that point, too But at least you get a starting point and it can be a living document that you you do work on from going forward But again you have to look at what in When we talk about enforcement a lot of the cities now are understaffed because of their public safety is Is underfunded you know due to constraints and so what do you they cut first? Cut parking enforcement, you know they look at priorities And so you know you’ve got to you know be supportive of city councils that are going forward and making your voice count in that solution also is is that they the Gear up towards that that possibility so you know and just make sure that You’re never giving up. I mean you’re always striving for more Well the good old days when you’re the general contractor, and you could just be the boss now you have to actually collaborate and stuff, huh It’s part of the process. Yeah, there’s no general contractors in the assembly Assemblyman Lackey, would you like to respond? Let me just validate the point that Communication is very powerful, and that’s really in my experience and being in local government that Engagement and honest Dialogue is where you actually begin to make progress that’s meaningful, and I think that it has to When we have the idea and the minds of those who are state legislators that the one-size-fits-all Circumstance because it’s a little bit simpler It really usually misses the mark and so really what’s important is that we Collaborate with the local governments because they’re the ones that implement the policy and so those are the ones that we need to communicate honestly and we need to seek their input and not just think that we’re all knowing just because we have a little more power sometimes that that can be a Curse as well as a blessing so we just need to be aware of All the moving parts that make a good public policy workable and I think that once we We are able to openly communicate some of the challenges that the real practical challenges Associated with the common goal because sometimes there’s some disconnections that you have to work through and the fact is Almost every one of the public policies that I know of that deal with access and these kinds of circumstances There’s some disagreement and so you have to work for the common good and to try to Do the compromise that’s going to have a meaningful outcome and improve the situation too sometimes incremental improvement is what you have to be satisfied with and the onset and then they’ll see the benefit and the workability and then you can keep moving. Thank you. Mr Debbs did you want to comment on balance striking a balance Use the mic, please My wife say I talk loud enough, but I guess I’d Someone said it and that is you have to start at the local level because that’s where a lot of the policy as it relates to what we’re talking about and So you have to have to buy-in from all the players you you can’t – one thing I like about your organization Ms. Jemmott is that you guys are not adversarial. I notice you have a good balance of Individuals who all agree on the same mission That’s hard to do okay And so when I noticed that and I saw that at the first meeting that I attended That was one of the things I said to Senator Pan that many of the people that’s on Your board they’re all going in the same direction. You had developers you had engineers You had all of these people who all agreed and Man, I thought that was a miracle. I thought that was great I don’t know if they were drugged or not But whatever you guys take you keep doing it because that’s what it’s going to take people all going in the same direction Regardless of what level you’re at if you can all agree on the mission, and then I think success will come Thanks. Any questions or comments from the commissioners? I’m listening and forgive me for sounding like a frog We have talked about this and Today we’re really talking about it in depth because with the diversity as you said in this room We all have different opinions, so one of the things I’d like to bring up would be a recommendation possibly From you as legislators from you who work with policy development Why are we – we need a way of getting the media and private industry the media and private industry involved in getting the information out. In my experience of Training and in consulting I find that there’s a real wide Broad definition and sometimes the misperception of What disability is and what it entails as a person and I think that We see a lot of media Presentations, you know they’re popular, but they do not really hit the catch of the crux of the matter it feels To me as I watch that or see it or hear it I find that I’d like to know what your perceptions might be in Getting the media and other and private industry both to get the word out. We are a visual culture The United States of America is in fact well the Western Countries are visual and unless you keep showing them saying it over and over again It doesn’t move as quickly as we need it to and I would like very much to hear from you and that about that kind of thing So you are right. We are a very visual culture One of the things that I would think that would be an asset is to work with every chamber of commerce going forward and making sure the chambers are able to purvey the message to the private business owners in collaboration with maybe the police departments in the jurisdictions Social media is another really good aspect of how a lot of our Millennials learn but also we have the capacity in the legislature to do PSAs and for TV and also radio, and you know I’ve done them for different facets of distracted driving and Whatnot and going forward, and you know I can’t speak for Assemblymember Lackey But I’d be more than happy to start that process. You know as far as with recommendations from the Commissioners and in this body of how I can better You know send that message of going forward And I think if there was a mission statement that was developed or already is here with the Commission I you know. I I think we could put something together that is pretty pretty cool. You know and You know, love to champion it with you, but you know social media Chamber of Commerces and then also You know we have message boarding on our highways through Caltrans, and you know and just mindful things that you know kind of Reminds you of things that you need to do to be more thoughtful This is something of a task for legislators Private industry and the community at large And that’s why I’m asking what you think with – what would you think about Really working up something with the media and the various outlets that we have access to Media as a whole They’re monetary driven and So they’re about ads and so I mean I don’t want to ask them to do a whole lot because they’re there to make money and I mean we need to be able to move the message ourselves through social media and I think that if we were able to demonstrate progress than the media would be able to start following it But you know I think that the biggest movement is with – to be able to get the message to the businesses that need to be Understanding of what the constraints are. the Chamber of Commerces are the best you know business districts are the best access to do that too Well, I think you’ve really hit on something very powerful though that you know education is as part of our culture and There’s no better way to educate or quicker way to educate through visual Communication and I do believe that there are champions for this issue that we can Call upon to try to he p us to communicate with the public as Assemblymember Frazier said you know public service announcements come at no coast We need to be champions for this particular Partnership with the media and let them know that we need their help on first defining what a disability is Something that simple can be a big impediment to progress and so Those are very astute observations on your part of things that we need to do to be more impactful And we can actually be pretty impactful pretty quickly if we do it effectively so I think you’re on to something Commissioner Betty you are absolutely right. I’m from the hood and What we are and I’m an advocate and you have to have something that’s worth the media attention Okay, so in order to get the media. Yeah, you got to have a gimmick okay? You really do you got to have something that’s going to attract attention, and yes PSAs are fine Too as well because that’s the educational part that reaches a lot of people, but this group would all well, you’re almost the grassroots group, okay, and Even though you you come from the bureaucrat side But your membership suggests that you’re grassroots Having grassroots people, okay It’s where you take it you take it to the streets and all you have to do is come up with a good media Something that attracts attention because the media loves Events, they love things that’s different, okay? I mean There’s so many things so if you sit down and just put your heads together and come up with a good media Idea you’ll be surprised You can even get them to come out on a Saturday and a Sunday if it’s good enough, okay But the point is you got to have a good media something to attract attention because along with that education okay Again, that’s what the media likes educating people and making noise So you got to come up with something Which will let people know what your goal is and what direction you’re headed in they’ll come Thank you very much for your wisdom on that from the ground The good news is we started a really rich dialogue The bad news is we’ve got to cut it off here because our panelists have to leave so maybe perhaps we can invite you back for another conversation and Well, I want to let you go. I do want to thank you, and I want to let the folks who are listening that This will be this will be the recording and the recording from this afternoon will be posted on the CCDA website And there’ll be follow up communications about this, and I think we have one more Sure, I just want to say one thing before we let them go. Just gonna take two seconds Gentlemen, thank you very much. I just want to follow up on one thing Mr. Dubbs said, I want to follow up, thee reason that CCDA out it’s all pulling in the same direction is that we recognize that ultimately Disability Rights is a civil right it is not merely a balancing of issue of Interest but it is a civil right on a par with gender rights and with racial rights and so everybody on this Commission recognizes that and so we Appreciate the fact that you also recognize that and that you’re going to work to support those rights In the process of working as legislators, and we thank you for your support [Applause] I don’t think there’s a better way to end this conversation then on that note. Thank you very much for being here

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *