Profile America Forum: Black Population

Profile America Forum: Black Population


[MUSIC] We really worked very
closely with the Census around the 2010 Census. We’re very pleased to
continue that relationship and have the Census here today
to share lots of keen insights with respect to major
trends that have come out. We’ve been working on
data collected in 2010 for a long time now
and we’re anxious to see your reactions to this. I’m pleased that we can
talk with you about a report that we released last fall
on the black population. the first concept is
what we call the race “alone” population. This includes people who
reported a single race group such as Black or
African American. The second concept, race “in
combination”, includes people who reported more
than one race group. So for example people
who reported that they were both
Black and White or that they were
both Black and Asian. The third concept that we use in the report is the
sum of those first two. The “alone” population plus the “in combination”
population yields the “alone or in combination” population. the Black “alone” population
increased from 34.6 million to 39 million over 10 years. the Black “in combination”
population increased from 1.8 million in 2000
to 3.1 million in 2010. The Black “alone or in combination” population
increased from 36.4 million to 42 million over
the last ten years. Here you can see that in
2010, 12.6% of all people in the United States
identified as African American. in addition, 1% of
people identified as Black “in combination” with
one or more other races such as Asian or White. Together these two groups
totaled 13.6% of all people in the country who
identified as African American. So I will start by discussing
the regions and states looking at the non-hispanic black
population by region and states. This map shows the Black “alone or in combination” population
was highly concentrated in counties in the South. Counties with 50% or
more of the Black “alone or in combination” population
were located in states such as North Carolina,
Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. The Black “alone or in
combination” population in counties located in the Northeastern
corridor grew significantly. As well as counties in the
South, specifically Florida. Counties in Arizona,
Nevada, California, Oregon, Washington and Hawaii. The Mid-West had pockets
of high growth in states such as Minnesota,
Wisconsin and Illinois. The Black “alone or in
combination” population in the South experienced
the largest declines in the percentage change
between 2000 and 2010. There were large
percentage point decreases of Blacks living inside
the largest principal city, relative to those who
lived outside of that city. This is mirroring what it
happening generally in many of the Metro areas
across the country. A lot of the movements to
the South have been going on for decades, that’s
where the jobs are growing. The people who are coming to
the South are not coming back. They are not coming
back to those jobs that they left behind. They are new people coming
to new kinds of jobs. The whole economic situation
is inextricably linked to education. So one of the reasons that I think we see individuals
actually moving out of cities is that they’re being driven out
by failing school systems. We have to focus on how young
people can early on learn how to create entrepreneurial
opportunities for themselves. We can get a good
look at the challenges that this nation faces
if we educate people about this information and if
we utilize this information to sketch out a chart
for the future.

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