Searching the NIH Website for Intramural Research and Clinical Studies

Searching the NIH Website for Intramural Research and Clinical Studies


>>Anne Zajicek: Hi, my name
is Dr. Anne Zajicek. I’m the deputy director of
the Office of Clinical Research and the Office of the Director, the National Institutes
of Health. The purpose of this short video
is to make it easier to navigate the NIH website
for the following areas related to the intramural
research program. Researchers,
research projects, annual reports from the
intramural research program, and locating biospecimens,
unusual research resources, potential research partnerships including the
bench-to-bedside program and opportunities
for collaboration at the clinical center,
training opportunities related to the intramural
research program, and clinical studies. The National Institutes
of Health, the NIH, is a complex medical
research facility with lots of people
and lots of studies. The NIH
Intramural Research Program comprises approximately
1,200 principal investigators who perform basic, translational,
and/or clinical research. The purpose of this short video
is to make it easier to navigate the NIH website
for the following areas related to
the Intramural Research Program: researchers, research projects,
biospecimens, unusual research resources,
potential research partnerships including the
bench-to-bedside program, and opportunities
for collaboration at the Clinical Center
grant programs, training opportunities related to the Intramural
Research Program, and clinical studies. We will start with the main
NIH webpage, www.nih.gov. So, starting at the NIH
main page, we scroll down
directly under that. And the areas I’m going
to focus on are labs at NIH, training at NIH,
and clinical trials. So, first, we’ll go
to labs at NIH, which goes to the
Intramural Research Program. We scroll down from here, and you see there
are four topic areas: Scientific Focus Areas, Principal Investigators,
Accomplishments, and Accelerating Science. Clicking on
scientific focus area, we see that there are
a large listing, in alphabetical order, of various areas
of scientific interest that you may be interested
in learning more about. If the area of scientific
focus is not listed, you can also query it
at the top of the page. I’m now going to back up and go
to Principal Investigators. So we click on
Principal Investigators, and you can find
investigators either by name or by scientific focus areas. So let’s try to find
somebody by name. Let’s pick the first
one here, Dr. Abnet. And here, we see his name,
his contact information, phone number, email address,
research topics, biography,
selected publications. And, at the bottom, other
related scientific focus areas, including epidemiology
and genetics and genomics, which may be of interest
to you as well. Now I’m going to go back
to the NIH main page to show you
how to locate biospecimens. We go into research
and training, and, over to the left,
you’ll see an acronym called, “NIDB,” which is
the NIH Intramural Database. This is where the annual reports
or, the Z reports, are located. So, in order
to locate biospecimens, we go into the NIH
Intramural Annual Reports, also called the Z reports.
We’ll page down to the bottom, and you can see a means
to search for biospecimens. Now, the biospecimens
are related to specimen type. So we have blood,
blood clot, buffy coat. Okay, so let’s click
on buffy coat, and these are the NIH
intramural investigators who have specimens
of buffy coat. You can see the names
of the investigators. There’s an envelope
to the right, and if you click the envelope,
it will create an email for you to request from
that investigator specimen. Now, let’s go back to search
the intramural research program to search the annual reports. We click search
and select a report year. We will select 2018.
Click continue. Then we select an institute
or center to search. And I will search
on the National Institute of Allergy
and Infectious Diseases. Click continue. And then I type
in a search term. I typed in, “Ebola virus.” Click search, and here
are the annual reports. I will click the first one
by Dr. Clifford Lane, “Pathogenesis, Treatment
and Prevention of Emerging
Infectious Diseases.” And it shows us
the report title, the year,
the principal investigator, the institute collaborators
from within that institute, other collaborators from NIH and other extramural
collaborators, the summary, and publications
at the bottom. If you click on intramural
research program profile, you can find more information
about Dr. Clifford Lane. By clicking investigator,
clicking on his name — and this will give you
information about him, including his position,
phone number, email address, selected publications,
and so on. Now I would like to talk about
locating unusual resources. So we will go into the main page
again, Labs at NIH. Scroll down
and go into Accomplishments. And the reason I wanted
to point this out was that there were
several accomplishments at NIH that have been in the press
that are of interest. And these use
several unusual resources. I would like to mention four. The metabolic chamber
has been used to document caloric utilization from participants in the TV
show, “The Biggest Loser.” The biomechanics lab,
which was also in the news for the development
of an exoskeleton to help children
with cerebral palsy walk. The Positron
Emission Tomography, or, PET research,
and ligand development for functional
imaging of the brain, is another unusual resource. One more is the Undiagnosed
Diseases Program, which focuses on
puzzling medical cases referred to the NIH
Clinical Center for genetic sequencing
and deep phenotyping. Okay, so the next area of focus
is training at the NIH. So again, we’ve gone
to the NIH main page. We’ve scrolled down.
We click Training at the NIH. We see training opportunities. We have
intramural opportunities, including the summer
internship program, clinical research training
and medical education. And the Office of Clinical
Research training programs, which include — again,
these are all live links — introduction to the principles and practices
of clinical research, principles of clinical
pharmacology, ethics course, clinical
and translational research in Ph.D. students,
and a midcareer sabbatical in clinical
research management. Two collaborative
funding opportunities are also the opportunities
and collaborative research at the clinical center,
the U01 program, and the bench-to-bedside
program. And again,
these are live links, and you can click on those
to gather more information. The last area of focus
that I wanted to mention was clinical trials. So again, we go back
to the NIH main page. Scroll down,
click on Clinical Trials. We click on Finding
a Clinical Trial. Scroll down, and we search the
NIH Clinical Research Studies. So in order
to search the studies, we type in a keyword.
So let’s type in Zika virus. This tells that there are five
protocols related to Zika virus. We click on the link,
and we see protocols actively recruiting new patients or following patients
currently enrolled. Clicking on this third link,
we have protocol details, including the protocol number,
their recruitment details. And paging down farther,
eligibility criteria, and contact information. The principal investigator,
the referral contact, and for more information. In summary, I’ve demonstrated
how to locate, in the NIH
Intramural Research Program, research areas, researchers,
annual reports from
the Intramural Research Program and locating biospecimens,
unusual resources, training programs,
partnership opportunities, how to locate clinical studies you may be interested
in joining, including healthy
volunteer studies. Thank you very much
for your attention.

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