Setting up a Journal in OJS 3.0: Module 2 – Background on PKP and OJS

Setting up a Journal in OJS 3.0: Module 2 – Background on PKP and OJS


Hello, welcome back to Setting Up a Journal
with OJS 3.0. This is module 2, Background on the Public
Knowledge Project and on the Open Journal System. As you work through the course, this material
will help you understand a little bit more about what we’re about and some of the things
we’re working on. PKP was founded in 1998 by Dr. John Willinsky,
then a professor at the University of British Columbia in Canada. It continues to this day as a non-profit,
university-based initiative doing research and development in scholarly publishing, with
its research home base at Stanford University in the United States and its operations and
software development home at the Simon Fraser University Library in Canada. From the beginning, Dr. Willinsky was researching
how to better connect the general public to the knowledge that is created at universities,
and quickly realized that online articles are not freely available without library access. This made demonstrating the value of university
research to the public very difficult. As a result, in 2001, he created Open Journal
Systems as free, open source software for publishing journals. The goal was to build a software application
that would make publishing articles so efficient, that they could be shared for free, among
researchers, but also with the general public. If you aren’t familiar with the unique characteristics
of open source software, we’ve included some material in the readings to provide some further
information. Basically, it is software that is free to
download, use, and revise for everyone. OJS provides a web site for a journal, as
well as a system for online submissions, peer review, editing, and publishing. It keeps track of every step of the workflow,
provides automatic notifications and email-based communication, and interoperates with many
other publishing systems, such as LOCKSS for digital preservation, Crossref for Digital
Object Identifiers, Dataverse for data management, ORCID for author identifiers, and more. As of 2016, over 10,000 journals from over
100 countries now use OJS for publishing, almost all of which are open access. OJS has been translated into multiple languages,
and many OJS journals are hosted at academic libraries. PKP recently released version 3.0, the latest
and most advanced version of the software. This course will be focused on this new version
of OJS. For more background on PKP and OJS, check
out the reading list in this module. If you have any questions, please post them
in the discussion area below. Thanks for watching and see you again soon.

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