What ACTUALLY scares us about Living in MEXICO

What ACTUALLY scares us about Living in MEXICO


Welcome back Tangerineys! If you’re new to our channel, I’m Jordan… I’m Maddie… And we are Tangerine Travels. We are currently living in Mexico, specifically
Puerto Morelos, and we’ve been in Mexico for over a year now. So, this all started in January of 2018. We basically decided before that point, that
we were feeling pretty dissatisfied and unfulfilled with our life in the US and it was time to
make a really bold decision and that decision happened to be selling everything that we
owned except for what would fit in our tangerine colored Prius C and driving through Mexico. So what was our biggest fear before coming
to Mexico? Simple answer, literally everything! Everything that we had been told by the news
media, Facebook, friends, family, anywhere you look is just that basically if you cross
over the US-Mexico border, you’re going to die! For a totally new culture, new language, new
setting, new people, we were literally afraid of everything! Anything that went bump in the night or day,
everything. The next big concern for us was how the heck
are we gonna make money? Because in order to do this, we had to quit our careers, sell
everything we own, and make the decision to leave the country… And leave our whole life behind. Yeah yeah, leaving everything behind. What if it didn’t work out? What if it was as scary as people say? What if it was as dangerous as people said? What if we weren’t able to earn a living abroad? The next big hurdle we had to deal with was
getting everything we owned to fit into a tiny car… Which – this is no easy task. We had two storage units and a three-bedroom
house full of crap that we had to fit in just a few suitcases. I had a business that I had to sell and 40,000
pieces of inventory that I had to figure out how to get rid of… We gave ourselves about six months to like
lift off, date and … Wasn’t nearly enough time… It wasn’t enough time. We were working that whole time. Every single day was filled with tasks to
get ourselves ready and by the end, it was just a flurry of stress and emotions and not
having enough done in time. That was a huge huge task and it took a long
time, super stressful. Once we started pairing our stuff down to
what we thought were the essentials, we also had to figure out what suitcases, what size
of suitcases we could buy and how they would fit sitting up, laying down, stacked, seats
down and then where’s Laska gonna go. It was a whole ordeal with measuring tapes
and boxes in the shape of suitcases… Never want to do that again! And besides selling all of our stuff and figuring
out how to put our life in a car, then you have the adulting tasks, which was just totally
uncharted territory most of it; like canceling subscriptions, setting up a bank account that
we could withdraw pesos from without getting hit with fees, getting Laska vaccinated and
getting paperwork for her, what type of paperwork did we need, what type of permits did we need
to drive the car in Mexico. And then the more we did, the more we uncovered
that we needed to do to be able to go to Mexico legally. Like – or even just in general, like setting
up a will or a power of attorney, making sure our family had what they needed to take care
of us should something happen like everyone said it would. One great service we used is a Traveling Mailbox
which gives us a U.S. address. It allows our mail to be sent there, we can
get it forwarded to us if we want and they’ll do things like deposit checks, some have an extra fee, some don’t. I pay 15 bucks a month. If that sounds like something that would interest
you, we’re going to put our affiliate link down in the description. And then of course, throughout the entire
process, we have the little voice in the back of our minds saying “no one you know has ever
done this before, certainly not at such a young age, don’t do it, it’s a huge mistake,
don’t leave your careers that you’ve built up, don’t leave your friends and family…this
is a huge mistake!”. So of course, we did think that, it could
be a huge mistake. There’s the voice again! It’s baaack! And now comes the fun part… Where we’re crossing the border into Mexico… Or should I say scary part, because at this
point, everything, everything scared us because everything was foreign; the language that
we had been attempting to learn, the new food, interactions with people, driving… I mean, let’s get into it. We’re still learning the language at this
point. Even still to this day, but in the beginning,
every conversation was super difficult for us despite having tried to learn some before
coming to Mexico. And then I remember going to restaurants and being super concerned that
I was going to get sick from the food and water. I remember we ordered nothing but bottled
water, only bottled drinks, just thinking that anything else is going to make us sick. Later we learned that restaurants are never
gonna serve you tap water. Or rarely, because they don’t want to make
their customers sick, if it make some logical sense. Any respectable restaurant is not going to
serve you tap water if you order a glass of water. And I of course was always concerned about
my food allergies, with learning a new language. Sometimes I wasn’t able to effectively communicate
what allergies I had or ask whether certain foods had my allergy ingredients in them and
basically at this point besides, you know, standard tacos, or quesadillas, or any of the Americanized
Mexican food that we had tried, there were a lot of dishes that we didn’t know what they
were or what they had in it or how they were prepared or anything like that. On the note of driving, everything felt foreign. People’s driving habits, the signs, the different – different road rules, the fact that
everything was in kilometers an hour instead of miles an hour. We were also very concerned about getting
stopped at checkpoints, at military checkpoints, and if anything was gonna go down there. Most of this was just fear of the unknown. We had never really dealt with things like
this before, so that was pretty terrifying. And anytime we did get stopped or pulled over,
it felt like – I mean, I remember being so nervous and so scared. Not that we had anything to hide, but it was
just like “oh my gosh, people with these giant rifles -” – rifles? Machete – not machetes, the – just huge guns. I mean, in the U.S., it’s just not like that. They usually have like a pistol or something
but not like freaking machine gun looking things. So that was pretty scary. I think we’re constantly thinking
crooked cops are everywhere, like that’s just the stories you hear. So these are the ideas that we had built up
in our head. Also the conditions of the roads. We were told before coming to Mexico that
the roads are so terrible, you must have four-wheel drive or your car is gonna get totaled. So we pretty much thought that was going to
be the case. The topes or what we called “topes” at the
time because we didn’t know the pronunciation. They’re speed bumps, but they can be super
hidden, unmarked, and gigantic! Like mountainous speed bumps that you have – there’s no way
you can get around them without bottoming out. On the freaking highway. On the highway too or on off ramps, I mean,
so – and that’s still scares us to this day… Those hidden topes. So at this time in the very beginning of our
travels, we kind of had the guilty until proven innocent mentality about Mexico, just based
on all the things that we had read and heard. So, it was like we had to keep our guard up
about everything and we always had these concerns; Are we safe? Is our stuff inside the
car safe? Is the car itself safe or is it gonna get stolen? Is Laska safe? Are we safe from
the food and water? All these different things. And finally, our last biggest concern within
the first like crossing the border to about a month in was getting our temporary vehicle
import permit, that’s the only way to drive outside of like the “safe zone” in Mexico…. Legally. So you need to have this permit or you could
get pulled over and the cops could legally take your car away from you. So, let’s fast forward, six months down the
line, things have changed a lot, our perception have changed. We’ve seen a lot more of the
country. So we finally started to realize that Mexico
is not the scary and dangerous place that the media would have you believe. So this half a year later, now we have totally
new things to worry about and concern ourselves with; like our temporary or no I’m sorry,
our tourist visas are expiring and the vehicle temporary import permit is attached to that. There’s a mosquito on you. In fact I feel like I’m getting eaten by
mosquitos too. I am! New concern… mosquitoes! So, then we had to make this huge turnaround
trip back to the border to start the process for temporary residency and that way we could
keep our car in the country without having to go back every six months, which depending
on where we were, could be a gigantic trip. All over the six months, heck even now
where we are over a year later, Spanish interactions were always pretty stressful, and scary, and
intimidating for us, and we had to do them if we wanted to get better. It never got less embarrassing, always an
exercise in humility but thankfully at about the six-month mark, we felt comfortable with
most standard surface level interactions. So that was very nice. Once again, thank you Rocket Languages. After about six months, one thing that started
becoming less of a concern was getting scammed, because over time you start to learn the dirty
tricks, you learn how things are supposed to be priced. But this is just something not
specific to Mexico but just something you have to learn with travel. Our final concern in the six month category
was just finding a good rental. It’s a huge time and energy suck and I think
this would be the case no matter where you are in the world, so this isn’t necessarily
specific to Mexico but we were always – we’re always trying to find places that have the
amenities we need like Laska needs to be allowed, We need to have internet for all of our work
online, and we are trying to look for a place with free parking on premises because that
is a concern. We were right to be worried about that, leaving
our car on the street. Lots of Mexican streets are super narrow,
so it’s not uncommon to have your mirror smashed off or your bumpers to get dinged up because
huge trucks come through or whatever and people can’t get through on the street. Fast forward to present day; now we’ve been
living in Mexico for 15 months. We are used to pretty much normal everyday life things
that used to freak us out. But there still are some things that concern
us or… I don’t know, that we’re scared of even to
this day. Before we move on, we wanted to say thank
you to Audible for teaming up with us on this video. We’ve had a subscription to Audible for a
long time because we think listening makes us better people and really there’s no better
place to do that than on Audible. On Audible, we listen to inspiring speakers
and thought provoking stories that open us up to new ways of thinking. Now, Audible members get more than ever before. They can choose three titles every month,
one audiobook plus two audible originals that you cannot hear anywhere else. We’ve taken advantage of this ourselves. Members also have unlimited access to
more than a hundred audio guided fitness and meditation programs. Ohmmmmm. You think Audible is just audiobooks?
Wrong-O! [Laughter] Audible has bestsellers, business, self-improvement,
memoirs, all professionally narrated by actors, authors, and motivational superstars like Rachel Hollis and Mel Robbins. I think one of the most attractive features
of Audible is that you can pretty much access all of your audiobooks and other content
anytime, anywhere. You could be at the gym, you could be in your
commute to work, you could be traveling and it will always pick it up right where you
left off. Audible members can also get free access to
the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post delivered daily to their
Audible App. One of my personal favorite features about
Audible, if you get a book and you don’t like it, it’s super easy to exchange it for a new
book and in addition to that, if you don’t get a book for a month, well, your credit rolls
over and your credits roll over for a year. And if you ever decide to cancel, all of the
books in your library stay there forever for you to come back to and listen at any time
if you want to. Audible really does have such an expansive
selection that it improves mind, body, and soul. You can be entertained, and informed,
and inspired. One of my longtime favorite books that I both
read the print copy of and listened on Audible twice… Is the “4-hour workweek” by Tim Ferriss. It got me thinking in such a new way about
how I work, and efficiency, and how you can do more with less effort, thereby giving you
time to do the things that you really like and care about like traveling in Mexico. Yeah, if someone’s looking for a mobile lifestyle,
the “4-hour workweek” is a great resource, a great tool like you said, it get thinking
in a – in a new way. If this sounds awesome to you, and it should,
you can start listening with a 30-day free trial where you get one Audible book and two
Audible originals for free. To start your free trial, go to audible.com/tangerine
or text tangerine to 500-500. Easy peasy audible.com/tangerine or text tangerine
to 500-500. So, the first and most important fear and
concern we have living in Mexico these days after 15 months, this is pretty serious and
yeah, we don’t want you to take this lightly, it’s, where can I find elote and esquite
in the various cities that we’re visiting… Because if I can’t, I am not happy… Haaauuu! No, but on a serious note, what are we concerned
with these days? Driving is still a very big concern because
it is not uncommon for kids to run out on the streets, motorcycles come zooming through
the cross streets without slowing down or looking at all. Bicycles and cars cutting you off, you have
to be – you have to have your eyes, and preferably multiple sets of eyes on the road at all times. And I’m not a bad driver, I’ve never
gotten in an accident, but there’s just stuff that comes up like those hidden topes or you
know, these people coming out on the middle of the road, various road conditions like
gigantic potholes and things like that, all the time. It’s very regular, this is just a fact of
driving in Mexico. So, that is a very real concern. Yeah. [Maddie making monkey sounds] Do not feed her! Do not touch her! Feed me! Elote! [Laughter] The next thing is, this isn’t really a Mexico
thing, it’s kind of an anywhere life thing, traveling thing, existing in the world, we
do have a little bit of fear or concern that we will become catastrophically ill, or hurt
in a car accident, or something like that. It’s just life but that is a concern that
we have, especially since we’re in a foreign place and we can’t anticipate everything always
in the way that we would in our comfortable culture in the US. Look at this guy! Hello sir. Woah! Holy! Oh my gosh, that was a jump! Another thing that’s on our mind day-to-day
is getting packages, deliveries, products, things that we need that we can’t easily find
throughout Mexico in stores or whatever. So, an example of this as I’ve mentioned
in previous videos are my vitamins and supplements that I need for my detox protocol for mercury
poisoning. Another example is usually like electronics,
but generally I feel like we just haven’t quite figured out how to get things – how
to get everything shipped to us, it’s a little bit difficult. And the Mexican postal service,
in our experience, can be quite unreliable. Yeah, so every time we have to have something
delivered there’s definitely a problem to solve or hurdles to jump through. Over? Through? Over. And… Over. Lencha? It’s name. It’s name? Right, Lencha? It’s yours? Hello, sir. Lencha Lencha, over here. It eats banana? Yes. Every day. Does it live here? [Laughter] Every day it comes through here. Oh my gosh! [Laughter] Go ahead, guys. How funny! Thank you. And you might remember from our last
video, we’re heading back to Phoenix soon, so we’re doing a little bit of shopping on
this one off of the beach road… For some regalitos… Little gifts. Regalitos, yeah, for our family and one of
our Patreons. Gerardo, this one’s coming to you. And what is the next one? Taxes. Oh yes. After we were here for a year, it was like
“okay, we have to figure out how to do taxes, how to get all the forms we need”, that’s
still a little bit of a concern but we sort of have an accountant now, so that’s taken
care of. Yeah. The other thing is vehicle registration. Even though the car is not being driven anymore
in the US, we still have to get registration updated every year and figure out how to get
that sent – the stickers sent to us. As of right now, they’re going to my mom’s
house and she’s sending them to us or as is the case, this year we’re heading back to
Phoenix, so that made that a lot easier. Yeah I don’t think – I think they make you
send it to somewhere in the state… Yeah… So you can’t do that unless you have one of
those mailing services we mentioned earlier or you have your mom… Thanks mom… And although we’re not super afraid anymore
of all the checkpoints, the military checkpoints and getting stopped between state lines kind
of deal… We’ve just been pulled over so many times
and nothing ever happens. Yeah, and well, people don’t even believe us,
the amount of times we’ve gotten pulled over, very likely because we don’t have a front
license plate, because in Arizona it’s not Required. But it is required in all of Mexico
so that’s often a sign that you have a parking ticket or you’ve got in trouble with the law
in some way. But anyway, that’s not really a fear for us
anymore. Running into these things or getting pulled
over like nine times in one 30-minute drive, But what is a concern are any unknown things
that come up like roadblocks where they might not be dangerous but you just don’t know what
people’s intentions are, if people are gonna get violent, or anything like that. So, generally just the unknown on the road,
that still scares me. Yeah, we have some of those experiences in
Chiapas… Yeah… On our drive through there and knowing what
happened later, it’s not as scary but just all the unknowns that would go with it. Should we tell this story or not? Well… So these roadblocks we encountered, the short
version of the story is, on the drive from San Cristóbal de Las Casas in the state of
Chiapas to Villahermosa, there’s a more dangerous road you can take where there’s – lots of
topes – with lots of topes and these roadblocks are very common there. And then there’s a less
dangerous road that you can take and that’s the one we took. We encountered four different roadblocks. This was a situation we had never experienced
before, so it was all completely foreign to us, completely new. But that important part of this is we were
told that on the unsafe road, it’s with lots of topes, it’s very common for there to be
roadblocks and hijackings. Like where they will even come on a bus and
like raid every one of any valuable things that they own. The unknown is the scary part. And still scares us a little bit because these
things do happen in Mexico, not all the time, not often… In fact this drive was the first time we had
ever encountered these intimidating roadblocks in the middle of the jungle where there was
no cell reception or no one that could help us for miles. And to encounter four of them in a relatively
short drive, that was – that was pretty crazy and definitely something we would be fearful
of making that drive again. To this day, one concern we still have is
money… And having a consistent income. Like we’re making enough to live right now
but will that always be the case? We don’t know. YouTube is pretty inconsistent, you don’t
have a consistent paycheck like you do with a normal job. So, that’s one reason why Patreon is so important
to us, so, thank you to everyone who has joined our Patreon, we really really appreciate you
guys! And that’s also another reason why we’re so
thankful when people purchase Rocket Languages, the software that we use to learn Spanish
because we get a kickback from that and that helps us continue doing what we’re doing and
making these videos that we hope are helping you guys out, or entertaining you, or inspiring
you, and also why we have sponsorships… Thank you Audible. Thank you guys for watching. If you liked this video, give it the old thumbs
up and if you haven’t already, subscribe to our channel to see more videos that we’re
making about our life in Mexico and travels across the world. If you think it would be helpful for someone,
send it to a friend, we really appreciate you guys. That’s what helps our channel grow. And one last thing… [bell rings] GONG that bell! So you get notified when we put out our new videos… And we will see you soon! [music]

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