Wise, quirky and scary advice from vicars, as reported in UK newspapers in the early 20th Century

Wise, quirky and scary advice from vicars, as reported in UK newspapers in the early 20th Century


One of the most fascinating aspects of reports in older newspapers is reports of what vicars were saying in times
gone by vicars were prone to giving advice on all
sorts of topics so, we have for example in 1939 reverend Roberts saying about domestic harmony and maintaining
domestic harmony he says, never tell your wife you’re
going to be the boss and he points out that it’s a
tactless remark and is fundamentally untrue He adds that a woman who tells her
husband she’s going to be the boss is sillier
still and brings the whole thing to a level of brute force So he clearly stepped into the marital
debates similar to those that go on today! And later on the reverend had the whole
family in mind when he suggested that members of
the family should try at least once a year to take
their holidays apart he said, there is such a thing as being too much together – it seems funny to us now that that advice should be given and we have the account in 1949 where the vicar from Barrow in Furness
offered advice about betting on football results and he notes how the 1,500,000 spent on betting every week was badly needed
elsewhere and he tells the readers of the West
Morning News ‘don’t be mugs’, he said. He points out that the chances of winning
are as remote as the chance of striking a match on a lump of wet soap or of opening a tin of salmon with a
lump a sausage – that’s homely advice if there ever was
one!

2 thoughts on “Wise, quirky and scary advice from vicars, as reported in UK newspapers in the early 20th Century

  1. would their be any way for me to purchase a newspaper book from canvey island from 1950's. my neighbor is from their, he is 84 years old and he would love to read from the papers from back then, please help thanks 

  2. I have been struck while searching the past of a rural parish how much of the written (and spoken) word was by the clergy. That is of course not surprising given that they were a very educated group including literature, the classics (including Latin, Greek and probably Hebrew too.) They often had at least two degrees eg in Arts then Divinity. Leaving religion totally aside, my point is that currently in some communities – rural but also plenty others, losing that source of educated discourse is a negative. In a city there are others who may take up that slack. I emphasise I am not speaking for or against religion.

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